Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Winterizing Fruit Trees and Shrubs in Racine, Wisconsin - Zone 5b - with some Non-Native Rootstocks

 
Posts: 31
3
hugelkultur forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For a context of what I am working on, please watch this first: Permaculture Project in Valley of Backyard - Hardiness Zone 5b During a kneejerk fruit-tree-purchasing excursion, I bought some fruit trees from a nursery based in Connecticut, where it is Zone 6a : -10 to -5 (F). I didn't account for the different rootstocks that might be necessary and am wondering if there is anything I can do to better acclimate the fruit trees for Wisconsin's winter. For the time being, I have wrapped all the fruit trees with burlap, but I imagine that will do little to protect the newly-planted rootstocks. I am hoping our increasingly warm winters and late to freeze falls are an indication that my hardiness zone might become warmer over the course of the next ten years. Also, I will be adding compost and topsoil in the spring on top of the straw before planting different perennials. Does anyone have any multi-functional perennials that would work well for the trees I purchased? I imagine I will need to get many nitrogen-fixing plants, so I am open to recommendations. Thank you in advance for any insight you can offer.
 
pollinator
Posts: 991
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
67
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What kind of trees? I think most rootstocks can handle zone 5.
 
Will Harvill
Posts: 31
3
hugelkultur forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I purchased them all from this website: https://www.treepeony.com/collections/landscape-edibles  I have the following trees:


Apple, 'Liberty'  - 1 Tree

Apple, heirloom 'Ashmead's Kernel'  - 1 Tree

Apricot Hybrid, 'Tlor-Tisran'  - 1 Tree

Cornelian Cherry, 'Redstone'  - 1 Tree

Pawpaw, 'Lehman's Premium' seedling  - 4 Trees
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 991
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
67
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't you think you have anything to worry about.  I'm pretty sure they are all cold hardy to zone 5.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 991
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
67
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The dwarf apples will need more care than standards. They can't take as much drought or wind. They don't seem to recover from diseases as well, but I havent seen any studies on that.
 
We're all out of roofs. But we still have tiny ads:
September-October Homestead Skills Jamboree 2019
https://permies.com/wiki/118704/permaculture-projects/September-October-Homestead-Skills-Jamboree
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!