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Wanted: Fruit Trees and Berry Bushes for Hardiness Zone 5b - Racine, Wisconsin

 
Will Harvill
Posts: 5
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Hello all, I am very new to these forums, and I am looking to purchase semi-dwarf fruit trees and berry bushes for hardiness zone 5b (-15°F to -10°F). To see what type of set up I have in mind, please refer to this video: Permaculture Project in Racine, WI I would also like to inoculate my hugelkulturs with mycellium, so the fruit trees can work symbiotically with a fungus that works well for my location. If there are particular varieties that you would recommend that work well with mycellium, I would definitely love those recommendations! I am hoping someone can also suggest a distributor that offers high-quality products at a wholesale price. I would like to get a root stock that is ideal for my climate, so I would need advice on that as well.

I am also not quite sure what fruit trees I will purchase, so I am open to recommendations. Some things I had in mind: an apple tree with four or five varieties of apples grafted onto it. A couple paw paw trees. A plum tree. cherry tree(s), A few hardy kiwis (males and females). A pear tree. Any other fruit or nut tree (semi-dwarfs) that would work well being planted near the previously mentioned cultivars.

For the berry bushes, I am open to recommendations on those as well. Some things I had in mind: raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, gooseberries, any other berries that you think will do well in hardiness zone 5b.

Last but not least, is there any particular type of fungus that works particularly well in my area? I know I am asking a lot, and as my knowledge and experience develops, I will regularly come back to the forums to give back what I have taken. I appreciate any insight anyone can offer and thank you in advance if you are able to assist. Grow on...
 
Steven Kovacs
Posts: 156
Location: Western Massachusetts (USDA zone 5a, heating zone 5, 40"+)
7
urban
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For fruit, what about American persimmon?  I find it much tastier than the Asian ones you can get in the store.

For berries, you might consider the various currants.  A wild food organization in zone 5 writes that juneberries, honeyberries, and mulberries are options.

PFAF.org also has a great search function - you can enter your zone, specify trees and shrubs, and specify that you're looking for plants with edible fruit, and it will give you a lot of results.  There are multiple serviceberries, chokeberries, barberries, hackberries, etc.

Hardy kiwi is a vine, not a tree; it is delicious but can be invasive.

Grapes (European or native fox grapes) are another fruiting vine that might work.
 
Ken W Wilson
Posts: 334
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I go for the most species that I have room to plant. I started with mostly apple and pear trees for fruit. Fireblight killed most of them. Now I have apple, pear, peach, cherry, plum, fig, apricots, autumnberry, seaberry, mulberry, and persimmon.  I have 4 kinds of nuts and all the common berries and some uncommon.  They aren't all susceptible to the same diseases and insects. Some will have great years when the others produce nothing. Most aren't big enough to produce yet. If they ever all have bumper crops the same year, I don't know what I'm going to do.

I also carefully select each variety and rootstock for disease resistance and suitability for my site.
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 131
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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bee dog forest garden
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-15 F is pretty cold. For kiwis, maybe go with the kolomikta family instead of arguta.

Maybe this is also helpful: Cold climate fruit trees - http://perrysperennials.info/articles/coldfruit.html
 
Kyrt Ryder
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Posts: 694
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
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Most (though perhaps not all) varieties of arguta are fine down to -20 farenheit (some lower)

Though blossoms can be vulnerable to late frost.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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