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Buffer crop against arch-evil roundup using neighbour

 
Charles Laferriere
Posts: 103
Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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Hey folks,

So, I'm planning my first real crop for next season.
I have 100' by 300' of land i'll be gardening for the first year.
My neighbour, on the other side of the road, does this thing called industrial government subsidised farming and uses gm crop with roundup. You know, the evil type.
So. As it appears we have evolved beyond the law of the bigger gun (at least, on some levels of society............), I wanted to plant a good fast growing crop to protect my garden.

I was looking for quite a specific crop, perhaps something that grows displaying a nice and wide middle finger look-alike? I can't think of a plant that looks like that, so I seek your knowledge.. Otherwise, I was thinking of jerusalem artichokes, since we only eat the tubers and they grow quickly.

Oh, yeah, zone 5a.

Roger.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2376
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Here's one list of roundup-resistant weeds:  https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/gwc/gwc-1.pdf

What's a weed?  A plant that you don't have a use for -- yet.  When you find a way to use it, a weed magically turns into a valued member of your permaculture guild.  On the list above, I see Johnson grass, something that my state tells me is a noxious weed, but my guinea pigs tell me they want more of.  I also see Palmer amaranth on the list, another useful edible plant.

If you research which plants are developing glyphosate resistance, maybe that is where to start your permaculture design.
 
Ken W Wilson
Posts: 390
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Johnson grass is an awful weed if it gets in your asparagus.  I think it'd be very productive for hay.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9604
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Johnson grass isn't that great for hay because it can develop prussic acid in drought, and become toxic.  If you never have drought ok, but I could never in a million years recommend anyone plant this horrible evil thing.

https://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/forages/publications/ay196.htm
 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1424
Location: Central New Jersey
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I think Joseph Lofthouse has an excellent recommendation, in suggesting the use of glyphosate resistant plants.  When it comes to whether or not to use a plant, I think it is fundamental to the permaculture concept that the decision be made in each design situation based on the specifics of that situation.  Look at kudzu, for example - it's a very bad idea in some environments, but it's a valuable plant in many ways.  I've heard of ranchers who graze johnson grass with great success.  appropriate technology, appropriate biology.
 
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