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Exciting potential: Medieval medical books could hold the recipe for new antibiotics

 
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Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, Adder's fork, and
blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/exciting-potential-medieval-medical-books-could-hold-the-recipe-for-new-antibiotics

Exciting potential: Medieval medical books could hold the recipe for new antibiotics

In 2015, our team published a pilot study on a 1,000-year old recipe called Bald’s eyesalve from “Bald’s Leechbook,” an Old English medical text. The eyesalve was to be used against a “wen,” which may be translated as a sty, or an infection of the eyelash follicle.


Bald’s eyesalve contains wine, garlic, an Allium species (such as leek or onion) and oxgall. The recipe states that, after the ingredients have been mixed together, they must stand in a brass vessel for nine nights before use.

In our study, this recipe turned out to be a potent antistaphylococcal agent, which repeatedly killed established S. aureus biofilms – a sticky matrix of bacteria adhered to a surface – in an in vitro infection model. It also killed MRSA in mouse chronic wound models.

 
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I love this, many of the old remedies worked, it was only "Modern medicine" that passed over them as bunk. Many of the remedies of the Amish work wonderfully well as do other "folk" medicines.

I will not mention what most "Doctors" think of my nations medicines but we do heal many that they can not.
Modern doctors look to symptoms and treat those as if they were the cause of the sickness. That is treatment not healing.
Probably our success in the face of their failure is because we look for the cause of the symptoms and then heal the whole being, body, mind, soul.

Redhawk
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