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Storing mushroom spawn long term  RSS feed

 
Cj Sloane
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Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Last year I tried something new. I never do my inoculating in one batch and storing spawn can be tricky. If you leave it in the plastic bag it came in, it can get anaerobic and nasty if sealed too tight, and if not sealed tight it can become contaminated.

I like to transfer the spawn to a container with a hard bottom and sort of tall so I can make the most of it and fill up my inoculator easier. I found  these filters for wide mouth ball jars and they work perfectly. How perfect? A year later my spawn is clearly still viable!
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Bryant RedHawk
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Fantastic results! Thank you for sharing the photos, would you mind giving a few details of how you store your spawn. Thanks again

Redhawk
 
Blaze Gorski
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Location: USDA zone 5b Ulster County, NY, USA 1200' elevation, catskill mtn foothills area
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I inoculated several mushroom logs (reishi, oyster, shiitake) and plan to save a bit of the harvest...please share your methods for preserving the spawn if you may
 
John Saltveit
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Yes, Stamets recommends fabrics as a great container for mycelium.  I just try to make sure that I leave enough substrate that hasn't been colonized and I keep air holes in my 5 gallon buckets.
John S
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Cj Sloane
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I store my spawn in my mud room. I live off grid so my fridge is small, otherwise I might store it there.


I live in Vermont so it doesn't get too hot in there during the summer but it does freeze for several months.
 
Adam Pickatti
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Here is a cheaper option,Airport lids drill 5/16" hole in a regular lid and stuff as tight as pissible with polyfil (from the craft store for making pillows and stuffed animals, I also drill a 5/8" hole that I plug with high temp rtv silicone(survives the pressure cooker[PC]) that makes a self sealing port I can inject liquid culture(LC) or liquid inoculants (LI) through. I use them for grain masters, LC's, invitro jars, anything you need Gas exchange on and want to inoculate with liquid.


Also


While sterile/agar work may be daunting it really is versatile and fun. Wedges cut from petri dishes of agar stored in centrifuge tubes will last close to a year in the fridge, also pictured is a "Slant": a centrifuge tube with agar dried at an angle with a toothpick popsicle stick or other piece of wood will store in a fridge indefinitely but at least 3-5 years. You dont need a flow hood just a still air box (SAB)and a PC to get started.
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