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looking to get started need help finding some land price information please help  RSS feed

 
shane burchfield
Posts: 3
Location: Tennessee
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I am looking for a price list of average sales price for land per Acer by state . I also would like any information on starting a homestead that me and my family can be off grid as much as possible. I am interested in Alaska Alabama Tennessee Kentucky Georgia Mississippi Louisiana Montana Idaho north Carolina Pennsylvania Arkansas Texas  but any and all states where I can homestead in. Please if anyone can help me or give me any advice I will be every greatful. Thanks for reading my post and for any and all information and help. God bless!
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1454
Location: Zone 6b
162
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It would help if you would tell us a few more things. How much land are you interested in? Rather than a shotgun of states, pick a few to start with, and tell where in those states you would prefer. It would help others in suggesting sites.

Read through the rest of the real estate here, it will give you an idea where to start. For example, here where I live, land varies between maybe $500 and $4000 an acre, depending on where it is and how big the parcel. (Example, one section of land is 640 acres, it might sell as one unit for $500 an acre... and that is how it would have to be purchased. In town, it might be having to buy individual contiguous lots that are unimproved, and run $4000-5000 an acre that way). Land here also needs a well and if you are getting a small parcel, you might face that expense as well.

When do you wish to relocate, or do you want to buy and visit a few times to get things started, then move on? Or are you going to show up with your proverbial covered wagon to lay claim and get started?

Would you be willing to go in with someone else to purchase a piece and either share or divide it?

Do you want totally raw land, do you want certain improvements already in place (or are able to provide them quickly, like a well), or perhaps go for a farmstead that's already there with a few acres around it (the most expensive but possibly the most instantly liveable, especially with children)

It looks like you would like central Appalachians running across from North Carolina and Georgia across to Texas, so somewhat mountainous and forested; then Alaska, Montana and Idaho. Possibly zones 4 to zone 9?  Montana, consider a few deep roots acres at Wheaton Lab?  (check out Paul's podcasts first). That would land you with likeminded folks...

We welcome you to Permies, and hope you can find your dream, just help us help you.
 
shane burchfield
Posts: 3
Location: Tennessee
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Deb rebel thanks for the reply I am looking for atleast 20 acres . I want away from people as much as possible and I have 2 others to go in on the homestead with me. We are not picky about the state those are the states I really like bit I would settle for good land almost anywhere. I want to be able to garden raise animals hunt and fish and raise my family is all I am looking for.
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1454
Location: Zone 6b
162
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shane burchfield wrote:Deb rebel thanks for the reply I am looking for at least 20 acres . I want away from people as much as possible and I have 2 others to go in on the homestead with me. We are not picky about the state those are the states I really like but I would settle for good land almost anywhere. I want to be able to garden raise animals hunt and fish and raise my family is all I am looking for.


Read through the rest of this area, 'Permaculture Real Estate' and people post about land for sale near them as well as land they are looking for. You may get an idea, or at least a place to check further on internet and look around for more listings. It will take some research but you should be able to find some places that fit what you want for land or a homestead site. Good luck.

Edit to add. If you look to the left at the buttons, this forum is under Global Resources. Click that and you will get a page with a lot of the topics being covered in this area. That will help you jump into looking at the listings for land available.
 
Galen Young
Posts: 49
Location: out in the woods of Maine
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We bought two parcels of land. One was $350/acre, the other was $900/acre.
 
shane burchfield
Posts: 3
Location: Tennessee
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Thanks for the reply Galen Young. If I may ask where about did you fi d this land and how big were the  plots of land?
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1163
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Land in this part of WI goes for $3000 an acre on average, if you are buying 40 acres or more.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 966
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
117
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Land prices in Hawaii range from $1000 per acre for land that would have no soil, no rain, remote.....to "the sky's the limit" ridiculous. In my own particular area, you could find 20 acres for $200,000 to $300,000 if you wanted soil and a good growing climate. Pricy. My own raw 20 acres with a small 2x4 & plywood two room shack and 2 catchment tanks was $225,000. Ouch. But I can grow just about anything year around. Have great weather, lots of rain. Lots of local game for hunting. Nearby fishing. Lots of local foraging available. No need to pay for air conditioning or heat. Incredibly low real estate taxes for a farm. 10 miles to town.

For a person interested in growing their own or farming, cheap land in Hawaii is a mistake to invest in. It's cheap for some pretty good reasons.
 
James Whitelaw
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Just wanted to share a few links that may be helpful:

LandWatch where you can narrow searches down to county/town level, w/ house or vacant land and sort by price or acreage.

Zillow can be useful in conjunction to Google Earth in getting an idea on lot lines. Lots of free resources for Topo maps are available.

USDA soil survey can help with identify soil types on potential land.





 
Tom Barber
Posts: 2
Location: Alabama
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James Whitelaw wrote:Just wanted to share a few links that may be helpful:

LandWatch where you can narrow searches down to county/town level, w/ house or vacant land and sort by price or acreage.

Zillow can be useful in conjunction to Google Earth in getting an idea on lot lines. Lots of free resources for Topo maps are available.

USDA soil survey can help with identify soil types on potential land.







Be careful with Landwatch - sometimes it contains numerous outdated listings.
 
Ana Funderburk
Posts: 9
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Take a look at Bonner County in the Panhandle of Idaho.  A lot of off-grid homesteaders and the codes and land prices are both favorable for sustainable building.
 
Kyle Neath
pollinator
Posts: 112
Location: High Sierras, CA 6400'
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A few things that usually affect price in a substantial way:

- Water availability: Are there natural springs? On a hillside (gravity-feed)? An established well?

- Access: What are the roads like? For Alaska and Idaho in particular, who's responsible for plowing them? What kind of traffic weights are the roads rated for?

- Zoning: What is the land zoned for? Can you plant an orchard? Subdivide? What are the property-tax consequences?
 
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