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Jewelweed Protection from Poison Ivy?  RSS feed

 
Ryan Hobbs
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Does this work? Where would I get seed for this?

 
Rebecca Norman
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Well yeah, but what works the best is to wash the urushiol oil off your skin with soap after any contact with poison ivy, before it has a chance to work its way in. I'm very susceptible to poison ivy, but washing with soap and throwing clothes in the washer always prevents the reaction. I get poison ivy only after unnoticed or second-hand exposure (and it is rampant in Cape Cod where I spend some time every summer). Any soap works, no need for extreme detergents.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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Hi Ryan! Does this work? Yes. (And, yes soap and water do too.)
Jewelweed grows thick here long our creek and edges. It's often called Touch-Me-Not because the ripe seed pods will burst when touched and seeds fly everywhere. They're fun to pop. Mine is anywhere from 3' to almost 6' in some places right now. It hasn't started to bloom or even form buds yet. That will be awhile yet.

If you would like some seed this fall, you can PM me with your address and I will send you some when ripe.
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Touch me not
 
Ryan Hobbs
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Karen Donnachaidh wrote:Hi Ryan! Does this work? Yes. (And, yes soap and water do too.)
Jewelweed grows thick here long our creek and edges. It's often called Touch-Me-Not because the ripe seed pods will burst when touched and seeds fly everywhere. They're fun to pop. Mine is anywhere from 3' to almost 6' in some places right now. It hasn't started to bloom or even form buds yet. That will be awhile yet.

If you would like some seed this fall, you can PM me with your address and I will send you some when ripe.


I'd love that. My grandma is the active but not looking out for danger type and is constantly getting into poison ivy or getting bit by critters by sticking her hands into dark corners. Every little bit of help is welcome.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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Ryan,
Not a problem. I can send some out when they're ready. Just let me know where to send them.

Grandma,
Keep on keeping on. You rock! 😊
 
Jim Fry
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Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
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Jewelweed doesn't really "protect" you from poison ivy. Poison ivy is not a poison. It contains a chemical that causes a "chemical" burn. Jewelweed simply washes away (and I guess neutralizes) the chemical. JW is a very succulent plant. It contains lots of "water". You pick a stalk or two, crush it and rub it anywhere that touched PI. Once you get home, I would also wash with the strongest soap you have in the house. We usually use laundry detergent. Be careful of your clothes and shoes, the PI chemical can lie in wait for you until you wash things. Dogs, cats and other animals can also have poison ivy on their coats if they've been in it. It's not fun to lay your face against the cow you are milking and the next morning wake up with face "rash".

It's our experience that everything in nature that may "harm" you has its antidote growing nearby. At least that is so here in Ohio. If you get into poison ivy, jewelweed is always growing nearby. By the way, many years ago a Tuscaragus Elder (some folks called him a Medicine Man) told me the people would eat a little of the first poison ivy leaves in the Spring as an antidote to PI for that year. I've never tried it, haven't needed to. But it might be interesting to try it (or not). I don't know.
 
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