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Jewelweed Protection from Poison Ivy?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Does this work? Where would I get seed for this?

 
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Well yeah, but what works the best is to wash the urushiol oil off your skin with soap after any contact with poison ivy, before it has a chance to work its way in. I'm very susceptible to poison ivy, but washing with soap and throwing clothes in the washer always prevents the reaction. I get poison ivy only after unnoticed or second-hand exposure (and it is rampant in Cape Cod where I spend some time every summer). Any soap works, no need for extreme detergents.
 
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Hi Ryan! Does this work? Yes. (And, yes soap and water do too.)
Jewelweed grows thick here long our creek and edges. It's often called Touch-Me-Not because the ripe seed pods will burst when touched and seeds fly everywhere. They're fun to pop. Mine is anywhere from 3' to almost 6' in some places right now. It hasn't started to bloom or even form buds yet. That will be awhile yet.

If you would like some seed this fall, you can PM me with your address and I will send you some when ripe.
IMG_20170713_095130599.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20170713_095130599.jpg]
Touch me not
 
Ryan Hobbs
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Karen Donnachaidh wrote:Hi Ryan! Does this work? Yes. (And, yes soap and water do too.)
Jewelweed grows thick here long our creek and edges. It's often called Touch-Me-Not because the ripe seed pods will burst when touched and seeds fly everywhere. They're fun to pop. Mine is anywhere from 3' to almost 6' in some places right now. It hasn't started to bloom or even form buds yet. That will be awhile yet.

If you would like some seed this fall, you can PM me with your address and I will send you some when ripe.



I'd love that. My grandma is the active but not looking out for danger type and is constantly getting into poison ivy or getting bit by critters by sticking her hands into dark corners. Every little bit of help is welcome.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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Ryan,
Not a problem. I can send some out when they're ready. Just let me know where to send them.

Grandma,
Keep on keeping on. You rock! 😊
 
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Jewelweed doesn't really "protect" you from poison ivy. Poison ivy is not a poison. It contains a chemical that causes a "chemical" burn. Jewelweed simply washes away (and I guess neutralizes) the chemical. JW is a very succulent plant. It contains lots of "water". You pick a stalk or two, crush it and rub it anywhere that touched PI. Once you get home, I would also wash with the strongest soap you have in the house. We usually use laundry detergent. Be careful of your clothes and shoes, the PI chemical can lie in wait for you until you wash things. Dogs, cats and other animals can also have poison ivy on their coats if they've been in it. It's not fun to lay your face against the cow you are milking and the next morning wake up with face "rash".

It's our experience that everything in nature that may "harm" you has its antidote growing nearby. At least that is so here in Ohio. If you get into poison ivy, jewelweed is always growing nearby. By the way, many years ago a Tuscaragus Elder (some folks called him a Medicine Man) told me the people would eat a little of the first poison ivy leaves in the Spring as an antidote to PI for that year. I've never tried it, haven't needed to. But it might be interesting to try it (or not). I don't know.
 
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By the way, many years ago a Tuscaragus Elder (some folks called him a Medicine Man) told me the people would eat a little of the first poison ivy leaves in the Spring as an antidote to PI for that year.

Have always wondered if exposure therapy works for PI. Figured anyone nowadays is too leary to try, even with this doctor recommendation.

Will update...
 
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Alex Jewell wrote: By the way, many years ago a Tuscaragus Elder (some folks called him a Medicine Man) told me the people would eat a little of the first poison ivy leaves in the Spring as an antidote to PI for that year.

Have always wondered if exposure therapy works for PI. Figured anyone nowadays is too leary to try, even with this doctor recommendation.

Will update...



This takes me back in time
My husband tried this, tiny bits daily...and then once ate too much.
Bad rash all over and maybe in the end it made him even more sensitive to poison ivy as he broke out systemically after eating cashew butter (a relative to PI) and seemed to break out all over his chest and arms if he was exposed to it indirectly while working in the woods.

On the other hand though, our boys were raised on goats milk...free range goats who ate plenty of poison ivy.  The boys never got a rash in spite of being exposed to it all around our 'yard' until we switched them to fresh cows milk when they were 10 and 13.
 
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I am sometimes forced to work in areas of high poison ivy concentration that has me exposed to it for many hours at a time over the last 20 years. Jewel weed aka Touch Me Not has been a huge blessing. If I know I am going to be exposed to the oils of PI leaves (urushiol) I will apply jewelweed before and it diminishes the reaction. I still cover up as much skin as possible and am careful to quarantine all clothes after the exposure. I also find that Jewelweed works very well in the spring and early summer but not so much after the plant has flowered later in the season and especially once it has gone to seed. As a precaution I also shower with dish soap to remove potential oil from my skin. Once I’m done showering I dry off and get back in the shower. Take a small handful of the plant and smash it up into a ball (leaves, stalks, roots). Put a little water into the ball as needed and squeeze out the plant juices and apply it to skin. The sooner you apply after exposure the better. I save the plant ball in the fridge and add a little extra fresh plant every time I use it. Usually twice a day until the rash is completely gone.  Have also tried the ivy block commercial products with some success. The one I have has the first ingredient of aloe followed by witch hazel, thyme, white oak bark and St. John’s Wort. As a side not I live in the east but briefly worked in the western US and was exposed to poison oak. I had gotten it so bad one time I had a friend overnight me some jewel weed. It did nothing for me. Was told by a local boiled manzanita leaf juice would work but also found it did not work for me. I am also finding some of the jewelweed patches I have visited for over 30 years have been completely wiped out by invasive species like Garlic mustard and Japanese knotweed. Though still locally prevalent I only take plants from areas that have a healthy population. And you don’t need much as a little goes a long way.
 
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