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Seedlings and the neighbor's Roundup

 
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I'm trying to grow I pine tree wind and noise break on the North and East sides of my property. This Spring, I planted about 75 short leaf pine seedlings about 12' from the edge, and I planted a few pecans about 25' in and on wetter ground.

Some of the pines and one of the pecans are yellow after the neighbor sprayed his soybeans. Not sure if they'll make it or not. The pine are only about 8" tall and several died from other causes. Will they be able to stand a little exposure to chemicals once they're established? Or will I have to plant farther from the line? I was hoping the waxing needles would help.

I don't think pecans can stand any Roundup, but our winds are usually from the South and West, I planted a lot more than I need, and there are several other rows farther away.
 
gardener
Posts: 6274
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Sadly, there aren't any poison proof tree species. Drift will damage or kill them, it doesn't matter the species, if they don't have a heavily waxy leaf coating, the poison will enter through the stoma and that means death to the tree, weed or what ever it lands on.
It is a systemic poison, it will travel up to the top leaves and down into the roots, thereby doing as much permanent damage as it can.

If you can't get your neighbor to time his spraying to periods of no wind or wind that blows the other direction, your best bet is to erect shields, these can be tightly woven cloth (will adsorb the liquid droplets and hold them) or plastic (will capture the droplets and run them to the ground).

Redhawk
 
steward
Posts: 4689
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Generally, people want to be good neighbor's. On more than a few occasions, I've visited a neighbor's home to tell them how pissed I am about them spraying poisons into my fields. They don't spay into my field any more.

 
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
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I grew up on the very north central plains, and  they had tried after the Depression to get farmers to plant 'shelterbelts' (rows of trees) to help hold the winter snow instead of letting it blow away, and to help protect the soil and keep it in place. However. Spraying the herbicides (especially from cropdusting planes) would drift it into the trees (we mostly had a version of Siberian elm) and they would come back after a few years IF it had been a light graze. Hit them a few years in a row, and they were dead. Generally herbicide spray and trees don't mix. Even once the trees are well established.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1333
Location: RRV of da Nort
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Just more a post for information than anything else.  It may happen that RoundUp/glyphosate enters the vernacular to the extent that we may inadvertently ask a neighbor whether or not RoundUp was sprayed, thinking that the question will cover all herbicide sprays.  Just a reminder that RoundUp is one current popular item, but one that is rotating out possibly with the emergence of others.  So always good, if curious about applications by neighbors or contractors, to perhaps initially keep the question more general to 'herbicide' or 'pesticide' sprays and then tunnel down to more specifics about what was applied and why.  One of the other chemicals gaining ground is noted here:  https://permies.com/t/68145/Keeping-eye-drift
 
Posts: 4
Location: Sacramento, CA
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Did your neighbor do the spraying or did they contract a truck / helicopter / plane to come out and spray?
If they did it, talk with them, maintaining good relations with the neighbor is important.
If someone (over)sprayed for them, they sometimes have insurance for that, go after them.
 
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