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Planting flower bulbs in wood chips.  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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I recently did some chop and drop in a weedy area, and then covered with 6" of 8" of wood chips.  

I have so many projects going I thought I would do something easy like plant a bunch of flower bulbs in the bed. Down the road, I can get to it with some foodstuff.

I have forty-six seedlings to plant and etc...so I'm looking for a quick way to get some root-mass in the area and the bulbs were cheap.

Has anyone tried planting bulbs into wood chips?   I could put a bit of soil in each hole but I'm not sure about the weed issue.  I just did this so most of the green-stuff below the chips are fresh.    Some of the larger bulbs require a 6" to 8" hole.  

How about digging the holes a little shallower and suspending the bulbs in chips with a bit of bone-meal?  The bulbs are your typical Home Deport varieties of daffodils, tulips, and lilies.

Thanks for your assistance!

Scott
 
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Daffs are pretty tough.  They tend to do well, regardless.  Tulips are a bit more fussy, in my experience.

I'd at least dig down till you hit the soil substrate.  Pull the chips back a bit, make sure there is good soil to bulb contact, and yes, perhaps put a handful of decent soil on top of the bulb.  Then rake back an inch or so of the chips.  You want to plant them, not bury them.  

I just did the same thing last weekend with garlic and I'm amazed that it's sprouted up already.  Once it's up another two inches, I'll push more chips back toward the plant to give it more soil cover.
 
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I planted bulbs around some of my trees that are heavily mulched with wood chips and I have had great success, but I always dig the bulb into the soil beneath the chips and then bring the chips back over the area.  i would never plant the bulbs (or anything else) in the chips directly.  The other option I have used is to make a hole in the chips, fill the hole with soil, and plant the bulbs into the soil at the bottom of the hole, but just on top of the existing soil level so the bulb can grow roots down into the original soil.  
 
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We planted bulbs in a 12 inch deep bed of wood chips and they are doing fine, this was done two years ago.
The method we used was to dig our hole for each bulb, add a double handful of potting medium and plant the bulb, cover back up with the wood chip mulch and level it out.
These bulbs were a mix and everything is growing and reproducing just fine, even though we always forget to water that bed.

Redhawk
 
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