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Weed ID, What is our field telling us?  RSS feed

 
James Whitelaw
Posts: 29
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Posting images from our 6 acre field that we had cleared almost 2 years ago. We have been just observing what has grown and post pictures here. The soil is silty sandy, underlaid by sand and a shallow aquifer (around 25 foot deep). We want to identify the weeds that have come in and will be planting cover crops (likely a rye, clover, field oat mix) in the spring and are working to grub out pricker bushes, fortunately not too difficult due to the lack of rocks.

Each “weed” is identified by a number. I can provide additional images if requested during the next few days or next spring. I’ve left these large to facilitate the ID, so sorry for any slow loading.























 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1415
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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10 is mullein.  What is your location?
 
Joylynn Hardesty
pollinator
Posts: 308
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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5  goldenrod
7  looks like a tree to me. Do the leaves match any trees around?
9  looks like some young and still short sumac
10 I agree, it is mullien
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 3129
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
253
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1 appears to be a shrub, 2,3, and 8 are clumping grasses. 4 looks to be a relative of tarragon, 7 is a baby tree.
5 is goldenrod, 9 is sumac, this will spread by root suckers, 10 is indeed mullien.

If you have access to an extension service representative they should be able to give you specific identifications on each plant.

It appears that your soil is currently bacteria and fungi poor in the microbiome sense.

Your idea for covering plants is good and will most likely help your soil tremendously in the next couple of years.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 2667
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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It's curious to me that I couldn't find any legumes among the photographs. What's up with that? Where's the clover, vetch, alfalfa, medic, etc? Wrong time of year?
 
James Whitelaw
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Thanks for all the responses!

In answer to Todd Parr, we are in Upstate NY on cusp of zone 5a-5b (trending towards 5b)

Bryant Redhawk, I was hoping you would respond and am hoping to gain assistance improving our soil going forward.

For Joseph Lofthouse; nothing has been planted yet on the land, so what is there will be there until the spring in order to hold the soil in the meantime.

Some back story, the 6 acre field was last cultivated in the 1960’s and produced crops of corn and/or hay at that time by farmers renting the land. High resolution aerial photos online from 1948 show the field as having been cleared. By the 1970’s a young forest had taken over except for about an acre that was still cleared and mowed. Grass does well here on the silty/sandy soil. The decision to clear the field stems from a desire to convert the acreage and surrounding woods to agriculture both from personal objectives and property tax implications. We tried to recruit local farmers to prepare the field, but the only interest was in cropping using glyphosate resistant corn. We offered to subsidize an organic effort, defraying any subsequent losses by the farmers, but were rejected outright w/ the insistence that it was GMO or go home.  The current plan is to brushhog the field in the spring and then go over the soil with a skidsteer w/ a harley rake we can rent and plant a mix of rye, field oats & Dutch clover.

Part of our concern is the shallow aquifer that exists under the entire property and which provides our 25’ Dug well water (extremely good water). Deep drilled wells in the area often provide sulfurous water requiring additional treatment. In two ravines w/ year round streams that bisect the 80 acres evidence of weeps are everywhere with water flowing out. In one ravine I found a weep down the steep hill that that drains into a boggy area, the re-emerges farther down the hill to again soak into the hill finally emerging into the boggy flat adjacent to the stream cutting through the 50’ deep valley.  Additionally there are a number of vernal woodland ponds that show evidence of trenching to drain them, 80 years ago judging from a tree growing in one trench. The ponds are now dry, but contained water and a plethora of frogs and salamanders last spring, despite having been mostly dry on the surface due to the mild drought over the last 3 years or so. Prior to that when we were getting the normal monthly rain and snow the ponds always had 10” of water in them. We look at the shallow aquifer as a precious resource, easily accessible due to the ease of extraction, but easily polluted, hence our concern for applying chemicals to the land.

The process of logging left the field has a variegated surface. In some areas the surface has darker soil (for example the area w/ the #1 & #2 grasses
), in others it is more sandy, presumably due to disturbance bringing underlying sand to the surface. The center has several inches of wood chips and sticks left by the chipping process.

The soil type is according to the USDA soil map Oakville described as follows:

Map Unit Composition

* Oakville and similar soils: 70 percent
* Minor components: 30 percent
* Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit.
Description of Oakville

Setting

* Landform: Outwash plains, deltas, terraces
* Landform position (two-dimensional): Summit
* Landform position (three-dimensional): Tread
* Down-slope shape: Convex
* Across-slope shape: Convex
* Parent material: Sandy eolian, beach ridge, or glaciofluvial deposits
Typical profile

* H1 - 0 to 7 inches: loamy fine sand
* H2 - 7 to 37 inches: loamy fine sand
* H3 - 37 to 90 inches: loamy fine sand
Properties and qualities

* Slope: 3 to 8 percent
* Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches
* Natural drainage class: Well drained
* Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): High to very high (5.95 to 19.98 in/hr)
* Depth to water table: More than 80 inches
* Frequency of flooding: None
* Frequency of ponding: None
* Available water storage in profile: Low (about 4.5 inches)






 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 3129
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
253
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James, I am pretty familiar with that soil type, I lived in Newburgh for two years at the edge of the 3 mile wood on a farm that was established in 1723.
Let me know what help you want.

Redhawk
 
Gregg Carter
Posts: 39
Location: Alabama
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chicken hunting trees
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5 golden rod  Goldenrod video
9 sumac smooth or winged is what it looks like sumac video
10 common mullien with out any doubt. common mullein

Goldenrod can be used to make a fabric dye
sumac makes a lemonade substitute
mullien makes a tea that is really good for upper respiratory conditions. I have videos on all three of these
 
James Whitelaw
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Thanks Bryant, will be in touch!
 
James Whitelaw
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Thanks Greg. My wife is already harvesting tender muellin leaves for drying. Sumac is plentiful on the property and in the area
 
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