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Rooting Goji berry clippings ?

 
Matthew Fallon
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Location: long island, ny Z-7a
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back in late jan/early february i took a bunch of woody clippings from a goji bush in my backyard that was vining all over...just stuck em' in water...a week ago they started putting out leaves (or flowers ?) from the nodules alog the stem, but n roots. now theyre really getting leafy

do i need to pot  these in soil , dip in rooting hormore?
or will they just leaf/flower out and die anyway?

you might've guessed. i havent done much propagating before.
looked in my books but not quite sure ...
 
Rob Sigg
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If you dont get an answer, maybe try doing some a few different ways as a fail safe. If there arent any roots, it might be because its sitting in water, but I really don't know.
 
Brenda Groth
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probably was the wrong time of year to root them, what you ended up doing was focing the blooms..pretty? I'm not familiar with them here.
 
Matthew Fallon
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talked to a horticulturist at soem classes the other day, said to take cuttings in a few weeks when it's warmer.
yea i think i forced them to bloom..
there are no flowers (yet?) just leaves out of nodules along the stem, i'll take some pictures soon.

turned teh compost pile and found an almond growing in there!, put it in a peat pot but it's turning yellow now. oh well.
 
John Saltveit
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I took woody cuttings, put a slice on each side, and put them in the ground in November. They all took.  I imagine now would work, but out here in the West, the summers are very dry, so it is good to develop the root structure before a long, hot dry summer.
John S
PDX OR
 
John Saltveit
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I took woody cuttings, put a slice on each side, and put them in the ground in November. They all took.  I imagine now would work, but out here in the West, the summers are very dry, so it is good to develop the root structure before a long, hot dry summer.
John S
PDX OR
 
Matthew Fallon
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ALL of those cuttings now have nice big long roots.definitely ready to be potted up, or planted out soon..  i gave many to people at our last raw-foods potluck and everyone was real appreciative'. i will be taking a bunch more cuttings soon. i think cutting it back will encourage fruiting.

 
John Saltveit
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There are different varieties of goji berry. Some are from Northern China, some from Southern China. Apparently the type I bought first was from Southern China.  It will grow here, and reproduce from cuttings.  Because it is used to more sun, it neither flowers nor fruits here.  There is a variety called "Crimson Star" that does well here in the PNW, even with our moderate sun.  People from really hot areas may want to grow the other one. I don't know if Crimson Star burns up or sun scalds in hotter areas, but I have talked to many who have been successful with it here. I bought it last fall and I look forward to it flowering and fruiting.
John S
PDX OR
 
John Polk
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For hot and arid regions, I would recommend the native US/Mexican variety.  Native to the low desert areas of Arizona, Mexico.
 
                    
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You might be able to salvage those cuttings by stripping the flowers and some of the leaves and using willow water or rooting compound.


John S, PDX OR wrote:
There are different varieties of goji berry. Some are from Northern China, some from Southern China.


Lycium chinense is the southern variety, I believe, while Lycium barbarum is the northern one. I've got seedlings of the southern type started, will see how it does here.
 
Matthew Fallon
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this goji plant finally flowered this year (planted in summer 08'  there is exactly 1 single solitary berry on it, but there were and are lots of other flowers, some have dropped off already but did not leave a bery growing in its place it seems?

curious what it may need to put out more fruit?

heres the lonely lil berry jus' hangin there  ,flappin' in the breeze.  its gotten really viney so i'm going to prune it back some again...
IMG_0676.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_0676.jpg]
 
John Saltveit
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My Crimson Star looks just like yours, Matthew.  You do have to watch it for slugs. Apparently, slugs find the plant nearly irresistible.  I have branches that are completely bare from slugs, and I could reliably pick one of the vine in the SPring late at night when slugs are active.  Mine fruited this year. It had about 7 mild pleasant tasting berries and I think it will grow bigger next year.
John S
PDX OR
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
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Anybody got seeds or willing to take cuttings from the southwestern wild variety or something else that will do in mediterranean/desert climate?  I am in L.A.
 
John Polk
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The native wild species (Lycium exsertum) is available from JL Hudsons

http://jlhudsonseeds.net/SeedlistLO-LZ.htm

it is the last listing on that page.  The "a!" in the header indicates that there are between 1,000 and 10,000 seeds per pack ($2.50).  If you order from him, be certain to request a catalog...incredible selection of many hard to find seeds, affordable prices, and good service.  His catalog is chock-a-block with useful information....belongs on every homesteader's book shelf.
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
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John Polk wrote:
The native wild species (Lycium exsertum) is available from JL Hudsons

http://jlhudsonseeds.net/SeedlistLO-LZ.htm



Thanks John!  Quite a selection there.  Looks like I may be ordering from them this winter.

For anyone seeking the chinese or tibetan variety, many of the dried fruits available in the health food store have viable seed.  I was successful once just breaking up one berry and tossing it in a pot. 
 
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