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Upcycle: chemical fertilizer  RSS feed

 
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Somehow I found myself in a strange situation. A chemical fertilizer distributor send 160 kg's of 14-7-17 + 2MgO+ ME slow release fertilizer (tomato fertilizer) to prove his point. We had an -not so nice- argument in front of some of his customers couple of weeks ago. I had no plans to use it, meanwhile it is bugging me to throw it away.
What would you recommend?  I don't want to hurt the soil and also as I remember adding Mg to clay soil is not a good idea. On the other hand, it might be a good kick, it holds many micronutrients. How may I release them without hurting the garden, such as adding it to the compost pile or spreading it while the plants are dormant and it is rainy.
 
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s. ayalp wrote:Somehow I found myself in a strange situation. A chemical fertilizer distributor send 160 kg's of 14-7-17 + 2MgO+ ME slow release fertilizer (tomato fertilizer) to prove his point. We had an -not so nice- argument in front of some of his customers couple of weeks ago. I had no plans to use it, meanwhile it is bugging me to throw it away.
What would you recommend?  I don't want to hurt the soil and also as I remember adding Mg to clay soil is not a good idea. On the other hand, it might be a good kick, it holds many micronutrients. How may I release them without hurting the garden, such as adding it to the compost pile or spreading it while the plants are dormant and it is rainy.



Why not return it to the distributor with a note?  I think that might make more of a statement

I'm not sure I understand what point he was making by sending you something that you had spoken out against?
 
s. ayalp
pollinator
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I seriously thought about that. I think he wants me to return the product, so that he can show me as a someone who objects everthing. I am a wierdo, wohoo, he wins. If I accept it, he will tell his customers that I am a hypocrite. He wins. I don't have his customer contact info's, so I can't tell them I didn't ask for fertilizers. Unfortunately it is a snooker and I am gonna let him take this round.
Meanwhile if I can find another way to use it (nature friendly as much as possible at this point), it will have the highest overall benefit. Free elements! :) I was thinking to add it to the compost pile, as Redhawk adds mineral and vitamin tablets; but I don't have a clue how it will affect the biota.
 
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I am not sure you are asking the right question here. Since it is relatively low potency fertilizer, I would be more concerned with what the inert material in it is, then the NPK content. That may be where your true toxic gick comes from, and might be the deal killer on where I put it on my land.
 
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If it were me in this situation, I would use it to demonstrate my point. I would set up two test plots, one using his salts and another using all of your alternative methods. Document the results, then send him a copy, put the results online and put a link on any website/social media his business has, do any and everything you can to get the word out. He gets the first laugh, you get the last.

But then, I'm petty like that...
 
s. ayalp
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Thanks Travis, I didn't think about that. I assumed it would be a waste to carry inert materials around the farm, but apparently not. Sum of the ingredients gives 64% of total weight so obviously 36% is just pure mystery. 36% is huge! Also half of that 64% is sulfur trioxide, and a quick Google search does not return anything good. Apparently it reacts with organic matter in the soil. So at this point -quick and dirty-, roughly 32% is fertilizer, 36% is something customer doesn't know about and remaining 32% robs from your bank account and gives you as a birthday present. Interesting..

That is a great idea Cody, I love experimenting. Moreover I have very limited knowledge about chemical fertilizers. This incident might be a reason to learn more about their ingredients. I might kill some compost piles on the way though :) , but we will see.
 
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