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Best Fruits For Storage  RSS feed

 
Posts: 150
Location: Western Washington
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Hi everyone,

In your opinion, what kinds of fruit are good for storing through the winter? I know of medlars, for example, and also keeper apples and pears. I do some canning and dehydrating but I'm interested in planting trees, shrubs, and annuals that bear fruit that store well on their own as well.

Thanks!
 
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Squash is a fruit and it stores pretty well, sometimes over a year in good conditions. But, that's probably not the fruit you're looking for! I'll try to find my root cellering book and see if there's some answers in there. I haven't gotten into storing large quantities of food, mostly because we don't have large quantities yet!

Hopefully someone else has some answers, too!
 
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Some quinces do really well, nuts, if properly dried and storage-type tomatoes.
 
Nicole Alderman
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oooh, that reminds me, there was someone posting on here a while back about how well and long tomatillos store at room temp. I'll see if I can find it!

Edit: Found it! He'd stored them at room temp for 6 months, and almost all of them were still good! https://permies.com/t/56424/reason-grow-tomatillos-long-storage

I'm thinking the more acidic fruits often last longer. Lemons and oranges seem to store a long time, though they don't grow here.
 
Nicole Alderman
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cellar storage for various fruits, from The Complete Root Cellar Book. (https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Root-Cellar-Book-Building/dp/0778802434). There's other foods in the book, but these were the fruits with the longest lifespans. No mention of berries, though.

Apples 4-6 months
Grapefruit 4-6 weeks
Grapes 4-6 weeks
Lemons/limes 1-3 weeks
Oranges 4-6 weeks
Pears 2-3 months
Plums 2-4 weeks
Quinces 4-6 months

 
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POTATOES!

 
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er are potatoes a fruit even my irish ancestors would not have gone that far although they preferred storing as ...er ..a liquid
 
Travis Johnson
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Well once again...in the same day...I must apologize for not paying attention. I failed to see the word FRUIT apparently. Again I am sorry.

In reference to Paul Wheaton's post about people not being humble and admitting when they are wrong, I at least to show that I can be apologetic and humble; great permicultural traits to have.

Recently I heard about Booker T Washington. Apparently he was walking down the street, kind of late at night when a woman approached the noble man, but did not recognize him in the dark, and asked if he would do the menial job of the day or splitting some wood for a token amount of money. As it was, he had little to do so he split the wood and even brought it into the house, where the daughter recognized the great professor. The lady of the house was embarrassed beyond belief, but the man said he liked to do physical labor. A few weeks later the influential woman helped his University get thousands of dollars in research money because of his humility.

I am not sure where I can right some wrongs of my younger years, but I hope to be more humble in the ensuing years as I only see better things being generated from it. Admitting when i am wrong is a start.

I apologize to the original poster, James for my oversight on fruits versus veggies.
 
A wop bop a lu bob a womp bam boom. Tutti frutti ad:
Solar ovens, haybox cooker - What would you build to go with a rocket oven?
https://permies.com/t/89917/Solar-ovens-haybox-cooker-build
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