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Too late for planting garlic in South central ohio??  RSS feed

 
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I was just wondering if its too late to plant garlic in my area.... I live in south central Ohio... Any info would be appreciated... Thank you in advance
 
gardener
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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It's not too late until the ground freezes solid. Any time before that is wonderful. Anytime the ground thaws during winter is still a good time.
 
zachary welch
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Thank you!!! Will be planting it tomorrow!!
 
gardener
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Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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Joseph has just said with confidence something I have come to believe here in the more forgiving zone 7b, where the ground rarely freezes hard or for long if it freezes at all.

But I have been curious about WHY it seems to be so.  Several guides to garlic growing advise that it should be planted in time for some weeks of growth (the number varies so widely as to call the advice into suspicion) to happen before the first hard freeze.  But in practice, this seems not to be needful; having the clove in the ground at first THAW seems to be the key thing.  I figured I was just getting acceptable results from suboptimal practice, but with Joseph’s blessing of the method, I feel better about my observations now.  :-)
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I planted potato onions today. I wonder if they should be planted deep this late in the year? Maybe they freeze easier if they don't have roots?
 
pollinator
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Location: 6a
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I planted my potato beds under straw and mulch about a month ago.  I know I got this from a book or another post but if you think about nature, she throws here seeds in the fall and they post in the spring.  I think that strictly spring planting is a monocultural practice.  I'm sure there are exceptions but the old school idea of gardening is based on monocultural practices.  I was going to post, basically, what Joseph posted but I only know it from and hunch and what I've read.  I'm told my potatoes will rot, we shall see.    Next fall I will do some serious planting and seed broadcasting
 
pollinator
Posts: 514
Location: Missouri Ozarks
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I've planted garlic as late as November 15-20 (zone 6b, Missouri Ozarks) with still a good crop the following year.  If you're really worried, I'd say plant half now and half in the spring, so that if the fall-planted garlic fails you'll at least get something from the spring crop.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Scott, I planted potatoes about a month ago under cardboard and straw.  I haven't tried it intentionally before, but a couple times my best potatoes plants were volunteers that I missed when harvesting the year before.

It was potato (multiplier) onions that I planted yesterday.
 
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