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Open Source Ecology

 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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What do you think?

http://www.ted.com/talks/marcin_jakubowski.html
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
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books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
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Very cool    and here's the wiki  http://openfarmtech.org.nyud.net/wiki/Main_Page
 
nathan luedtke
Posts: 165
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Paul told me on Facebook to start a Permies post about this, so here I go.

WATCH THIS VIDEO: http://www.ted.com/talks/marcin_jakubowski.html

This dude Marcin is doing possibly the most important work out of anybody in the world. What a visionary. I am not a skilled fabricator or engineer, so I support his organization through a $10/month pledge. IF you are a fabricator, engineer, machinist, physicist, CAD wizard, etc etc you should look into volunteering your energy to push this project forward. They are talking about, very simply, creating a blueprint for sustainable local industry and human habitat by the end of 2012. If you have money, send money, if you have energy, spread the word, and if you have skillz, go to work on this project- spec out the machines that haven't been prototyped yet, set up a network of local colleagues to create prototypes, whatever you can do.
 
Jami McBride
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
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books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
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I merged these two threads, because hey they are the same 
 
                                
Posts: 41
Location: Missouri
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I predict, if these guys are able to complete their project, the rush to rural life will increase exponentially.  Considering the cost of living inequality that exists in urban environments, the fact that the government is contemplating reductions in all levels of educational spending, reduction in fossil fuels and basic resources, something has got to give.  I know so many kids who are buying houses together with acreage with the intention of homesteading as a group.  Intentional living communities will increase tenfold.  My only concern is how these things are fueled.  Standard gasoline, biomass, battery?
 
nathan luedtke
Posts: 165
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Nerdmom wrote:
  My only concern is how these things are fueled.  Standard gasoline, biomass, battery?


Fuel is flexible. All the devices get their power from "powercubes" which are modular hydraulic motors, could be run on any fuel available. So for example, you could have a tractor, car, brick press, and drill press, and also have 2 powercubes, one that runs on locally-produced ethanol, one that runs on wood gas. Or what have you. And then power which ever device you want to use with either powercube, depending on what fuel you have available.

Modularity is key. The eventual goal is that powercubes will incorporate a hyperefficient steam engine that they are now developing.
 
                                
Posts: 41
Location: Missouri
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nate wrote:
Fuel is flexible. All the devices get their power from "powercubes" which are modular hydraulic motors, could be run on any fuel available. So for example, you could have a tractor, car, brick press, and drill press, and also have 2 powercubes, one that runs on locally-produced ethanol, one that runs on wood gas. Or what have you. And then power which ever device you want to use with either powercube, depending on what fuel you have available.

Modularity is key. The eventual goal is that powercubes will incorporate a hyperefficient steam engine that they are now developing.


Squeee!!
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I love steam engines.  They can be built to use a variety of fuels (including renewable fuels).  The modern ones usually have automated firing systems which eliminate most of the labor.  They still form the backbone of the US Merchant Marine fleet.  I would like to see a newer generation steam engine industry building for many stationary applications.  They do require more engineering skills to operate than a diesel or gasoline engine, but fail-safe designs could be developed for the home user.
 
Paul Gutches
Posts: 104
Location: Taos, New Mexico
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Glad to see this is on the radar here.

One of the few Kickstarter campaigns I supported.

So, is anyone here seriously looking in to having some of these built?
Perhaps as a local group buy in / small group share?

This movement would appear to perfectly compliment the permaculture movement.

With machines like these permaculture practices could spread more rapidly, more substantially, and more cheaply.





 
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