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Su Ba's Photos of Her Homestead Farm

 
gardener
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Let me echo the praise of others for sharing your beautiful pictures with us.  Please, more photos of your stone walls and earthworks.  

I love everything about what you are doing!  Keep up the great work.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1585
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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The photos I'm posting today are from my blog. So if you're a blog follower, you'll instantly recognize them. I thought I'd like to share them with the permies.

Early on we had a small barn, a mini barn, built down by the street. Its the one building on this farm that we didn't put our own labor into. It's used for equipment storage. Initially it was painted a neutral green with white trim.....how normal, how mundane. It blended right into the landscape. Suburban-ites would have loved it. But I'm at a point in my life where I'm not interested in mundane. I want my world to be alive! So hubby came up with a different color scheme. We carried it over to a small shed too. I really like the results. And I haven't heard anything negative from the neighbors. In fact, it inspired one neighbor who operates a restaurant in town to paint her restaurant bright and wild colors too. How cool!!

This barn exemplifies our farm. It's basically traditional but also definitely not, all at the same time. Yes, we're a farm producing farm stuff, but we are different from usual farms in some pretty wild ways.

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The front of the mini barn facing the street.
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The back of the barn.
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A small storage shed.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 1585
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
555
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Lambs

This December should be lambing time here on the farm. All the mature ewes appear to be pregnant. I didn't breed the youngest ewes since I felt that they needed to grow in size a bit more. Two of the ewes look to be carrying twins, or more. The rest look to be pregnant with singlets. Frankly, I'm hoping for singlets. They do better than twins and don't drag down the ewes as badly. I'm very happy with solo lambs for each mom.

I figure most of the ewes should lamb the first week of December, but it looks like a couple won't wait that long. One of the ewes is already starting to bag up, though she has a way to go yet.
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Quite the dropped belly!
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One very thick ewe.
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A drooping belly, but I think it's just one lamb in there.
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My oldest ewe looks to be carrying a singlet.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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This past week we made some bamboo trellises. Nothing complicated. Not even well made, but they should work. This was my first time constructing something with bamboo. I've been growing this particular bamboo on my farm for the past 15 years. I'm finally starting to use it. One trellis was made at the entrance to the main garden (which is fenced in to protect it from stray livestock). Another was built by the far second entrance. For right now they are put together using wire, and stabilized with t-posts. I'll screw them together later if I'm satisfied with their configuration. I plan to grow lilikoi (passionfruit) as a perennial crop, and while the vines are still small, I'll grow some temporary crops such as pole beans or peas. I purposely built them wide enough so that I can drive my ATV through them. I use the ATV to bring in compost to the garden beds.

The one corner of the main garden cannot be used for intensive crops due to the ohia tree roots. But the spot is fine for a few pumpkin vines. After top dressing  the ground within the drip line of the tree, I applied fresh mulch. Then I planted 4 pumpkins and interspaced rooted peppermint cuttings which will become a bit of a ground cover. For top dressing I used a light covering of old compost, then a light covering of fresh sheep manure. I also dumped some kitchen waste and coffee grounds that had been donated to me. For mulch I used fresh grass clippings. I will need to apply more light layers of grass clippings every other week for a while to keep weeds suppressed.
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Trellis at the garden entrance.
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Temporarily wired together.
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Top dressing the pumpkin area.
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Pumpkin & peppermint planted. Area mulched with fresh grass.
 
pollinator
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Really like the bamboo trellis. Actually really enjoy watching your thread and progress. You have an awesome farm.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Yesterday I managed to fit in to my job's list planting more pineapples. Got a whole second row in along the driveway. I had already prepared the site two weeks ago by scalping the grass with a mower, scuffing the surface with a rototiller to cut off the grass at the surface, spreading compost, then topping it with grass mulch. Pineapples are one crop I can grow here via no-till, though they do much better when compost is tilled in first. But this spot is almost all packed chunky rock, so tilling of any sort is not possible. I haven't planted any cover crop because of lack of time and availability. So for now the pineapples will be living solo with close neighbors of taro and grass. If I could, I'd most likely put in chocolate mint or peppermint. These are both easy to pull out excess growth amid the pineapples.....and they smell good.

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Now I am super curious what sports would be like if we allowed drugs and tiny ads.
holiday shopping for 2019
https://permies.com/t/128446/holiday-shopping
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