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Growing nuts up North (cold resistant)

 
pollinator
Posts: 237
Location: Kachemak Bay, Alaska (usda zone 6, ahs heat zone 1, lat 59 N, coastal, koppen Dfc)
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Great news about your kiwis, Victor!   I ate about 20 little fruits off a vine last year.  The pot I mentioned above some years ago was planted by a west facing wall on a building I built for someone.  I think it has been in the ground 4 years, along with a male in the same location.   I have where I live now a male and no female, so I'm planning to attempt to graft a bit of female onto the male vine.
 
pollinator
Posts: 449
Location: Iron River MI zone 3b
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hugelkultur fungi foraging chicken cooking medical herbs
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What kind of soil do you have there? Were in the UP (iron county) and we planted 4 hybrid chestnuts last spring. I thought they were doing fine, but as of now they haven’t even broken bud or leafed out yet. The buds actually dont even look like they’re growing. I read chestnuts do poorly in heavy soil (we have a lot of clay) and didn’t know that before planting. They were fed compost, mulched, planted with comfrey, fenced in and kept watered. I really dont want to lose these trees but am worried it may be too late.

Can heavy soil be amended reasonably for chestnuts to thrive? Or is there a different nut tree (not black walnut!) that does well in cold winters, droughts, heavy soil...? I’m really bumming about these trees. They were supposed to be the oversrory of our food forest and be a food source for generations to come.
 
gardener
Posts: 452
Location: Geraldton, Ontario -Zone 1b
146
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I wish there was a better way to describe one's climate other than "up north", etc. When I see "up north", I get excited that somebody might be talking about my region, but I'm always let down. To be fair, there are people more up north than me and I'm sure they are even more frustrated. Using hardiness zones might be better but even those are ambiguous when different countries are involved.  
 
pollinator
Posts: 1990
Location: Denmark 57N
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Michael Helmersson wrote:I wish there was a better way to describe one's climate other than "up north", etc. When I see "up north", I get excited that somebody might be talking about my region, but I'm always let down. To be fair, there are people more up north than me and I'm sure they are even more frustrated. Using hardiness zones might be better but even those are ambiguous when different countries are involved.  



Ha ha yes I'm much further north than you but 6 zones warmer and several heatzones colder..
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