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What are the better growing fruit trees for S.C. Missouri Ozarks

 
Posts: 3
Location: Elk Creek, Missouri
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I am wanting to grow a home, possibly market, orchard on my 22 acres in Texas County, Missouri. What are some good growing fruit trees and/or varieties for this area?  Its alot of rock and clay, higher humidity, USDA growing zone 6b.
 
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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This thread may have some helpful information of what others are growing in a similar area.

It also looks like the first post may be from someone kind of close to where you are.

Fruit Trees and Berries that Grow Best in Your Area Naturally- Temperate Zone 6

Hope this helps!
 
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Location: OK High Plains Prairie, 23" rain avg
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When I lived in Northwestern Arkansas in the Ozarks there were apple trees, persimmon trees, serviceberry, pin cherries, and many different nut trees.
 
Posts: 136
Location: Seymour, MO Zone 6a
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We are in Seymour, MO and are wondering the same. We just moved here from another part of the state, but found out there is an apple festival here. Apparently used to be a fairly big apple producing area with produce shipped out by rail. I'll have to poke around a bit to see what I can come up with.
 
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Location: West Fork, AR
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I live in the Ozarks in Northwest Arkansas and select everything I grow for low maintenance and disease resistance so I can grow organically.  I have an online bare-root nursery https://foodforestnursery.com/ selling these same varieties.

I've had good luck with berries and improved cultivars of the native fruiting plants like persimmon, mulberry, elderberry and pawpaw.

Berries
Raspberries
Elderberries
Currants
Blackberries
Gooseberries
Jostaberries
Serviceberries

Fruit Trees
Persimmon (Asian and Improves American)
Mulberries
Pears (Mostly Asian and Hybrids for disease resistance)
Apples (Again disease resistant varieties)
PawPaw
Figs (they dies back to the ground here but if you top them in the spring they will fruit in the first year of regrowth)
Peaches and Plums (these are hard to grow because of disease but I try anyways)

Nut Trees
Pecans
Chinese Chestnut
Hybrid Hazelnuts
Hicans
Hickory
Walnut
Almonds (related to peach and plum and struggle too)

Good Luck!



 
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If you have lots of eastern red cedar around you you'll want to avoid the rose family trees: serviceberry, apple, and pears. Serviceberry in particular is horrible for cedar rust.
 
Posts: 63
Location: Ozark Border
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As Luke said, a lot of the southern Ozarks was once a pretty popular area for market apple orchards.  Apples, peaches, and pears do well, the University of Missouri Extension program puts out a lot of publications on what varieties do best in the state.  MU Extension- fruit production

I've heard of folks having success with tart cherries.  Blackberries and elderberries do well in the Ozarks. A lot of Texas county was historically covered by native shortleaf pine forest- if your property has any, or has any sandstone-derived soils, you may be able to get away with blueberries.  There are small, native blueberry species that grow in parts of the Ozarks.  

Good luck!
 
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Look at this website for info for what will GROW....   "All the following varieties (all on MM.111) survived ten years of almost total neglect (no water, no sprays, no pruning) from 2000-2010. That should tell you something!"

https://amesorchardandnursery.com/



 
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I echo the comment about peaches being difficult to do here, organically at least. One thing to consider is elevation. I have friends who planted hundreds of fruit trees and rarely get the harvest they desire because they live in a low lying area. They will get frosts later than we do up on a hill with south facing slope. You may keep that in mind too.
 
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