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Hey Guys,
I bet you all know Bear Grylls and his breathtaking adventures!!! Here is his EDC tool:


 
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Yes indeed I love my SOG model, so many uses on the farm.
 
Danny Matteo
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Yes indeed I love my SOG model, so many uses on the farm.


Yup, you are right. There are so many uses!!
 
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Parangs and kukris are among my favourite blades, far more useful than simple machetes.

I think if the terrain I was moving through was largely vegetative, I would prefer the parang, but if there was a lot of woody material, I think I would use the kukri.

I suppose what I'd like to see is a free-hanging rope cutting demo to compare the two.

-CK
 
Bryant RedHawk
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When you use the free hanging rope cut, what you are testing is the edge not the design of the blade.
For testing the blade design you need a tightly rolled up bamboo mat, this forces the blade to drive the edge through.

I spent a few months learning how to put a katana edge on my blades, if there is enough weight in the blade, mine will slice through a rope with just the force of the blade weight.

I like the kukri blade but it was designed for jungle fighting so it should do several things well. The parang is similar in that it is also a fighting knife design for jungle use.

There are four machete blade designs that I really like but these are more farm designed than fighting designed blades.
The SOG blade I have is best for hacking through small trees and branches or slicing through jungle foliage, it will also take a head off with a single swipe if needed.

For me, I choose the blade that is best suited for the job, what ever that job might be. (I have a fair number of blades to choose from)


 
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:
The SOG blade I have is best for hacking through small trees and branches or slicing through jungle foliage, it will also take a head off with a single swipe if needed.

For me, I choose the blade that is best suited for the job, what ever that job might be. (I have a fair number of blades to choose from)




Redhawk, which model is it that you have?  I have a couple, but I'm not completely happy with either.
 
Chris Kott
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Many tools for many different needs...

I like Cold Steel. They make a diverse range of machetes, and their swords are cool. I have one of their regular sized kukris, and I think it cost me $30. They have some very interesting offerings.

I always thought the rope cut test did a good job of demonstrating the practical effect of specific blade geometry, any curve in the blade that would angle a chop like a guillotine. I think it requires a properly sharpened blade so that the rope doesn't skid across a dull edge, but if the blade is sharp enough to bite the fibres, the differences between blades with different geometries can be readily seen based on resistance to the cut, seen as movement of the hanging rope.

-CK
 
Bryant RedHawk
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My "Sogfari" is the first model they made I think, I got it back in the 90's, 13", with a .15" thick blade back (the new ones are much thinner (.09"), which would not work as well).
When I bought mine it was just called "Short Machete", The grip on mine is different too being more of a hard rubber feel than the new models.
I have noticed at the store that the checkering on my handle seems deeper too.

Most of my favorite blades are Cold Steel Chris. I also have some Gerber, specific blades from my trips to Vietnam in 1969.

My thoughts on the "rope test" are probably biased.
 
Todd Parr
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My brother works for Mathews bow company, and shoots with them at events all over the country.  The owner of Cold Steel is at the events, so my brother has met with him and talked to him quite a few times.  Earlier this week, my brother got a box in the mail that had a bunch of Cold Steel videos, and a Cold Steel Ultimate Hunter.  He sent all the stuff to my brother free, just because he is a good guy.  I've been buying Cold Steel knives for many years, and I'll do even more to support him now.  Very, very good guy, and very good knives for the price.  The Ultimate Hunter is a really well put together knife.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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One of my favorites is my Cold Steel 12" Tanto, they don't make it anymore I've been told by a collector.

I stopped going to gun and knife shows because when I would go, I'd take a few of my blades with me and dealers would try to buy them from me.
One time I took my Yoshindo Yoshihuro Katana to a show because a collector friend of mine was there and had wanted to see my sword.
He tried to buy it! I had to explain that it would never be for sale. He was so instant that He just had to have it, I just walked away and have not spoken to him since.

I love Matthews bows, just can't justify spending the money for one right now and since I am getting older I will probably just stick with my current fred bear.
 
Chris Kott
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I think you just see it differently than I, kola Redhawk. Though your experience far outweighs mine...

It's probable that the nuance that such a specific rope test might yield in results wouldn't matter a whit to how it swings and how you use it in the bush or elsewhere.

Do you prefer a softer carbon steel that is more easily sharpened but needs sharpening more frequently, or a layered mix that might require more precise workshop sharpening and equipment?

-CK
 
Bryant RedHawk
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My preference is for soft iron cores wrapped in hard steel or something built sanmai. These are usually only found from Japanese smiths. (cold steel made a few sanmai blades)
After those I prefer high carbon steel then some of the special stainless steels like the ones Cold Steel and SOG use.

One of my favorite makers was also a friend, Jimmy Lile made wonderful blades, they felt right in the hand and worked extremely well, I was very sad when he passed away.
I bought my last Lile's from his wife when I helped her clean out his shop.
I own only one Kukri, it was a gift from a man I met who was from Nepal, his grandfather had been a Gurkha warrior, my Kukri, he said was his grandfather's blade.
I have only sharpened it once but I use camellia oil on it once a month, it sits in the case with my battle knives.
(my wife says I have too many knives and guns, she refers to that room as "the arsenal")
 
Todd Parr
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:... I have too many knives and guns,...



I choose to think there is no such thing.  In addition to my other guns, I have 14 AK-47s.  I call that a good start.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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She has come to the conclusion that we probably have just enough.
I pointed out that an arsenal would be enough weaponry to outfit a division, and that I don't even have enough to outfit a team, so it can't possibly be too many.

 
Danny Matteo
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:When you use the free hanging rope cut, what you are testing is the edge not the design of the blade.
For testing the blade design you need a tightly rolled up bamboo mat, this forces the blade to drive the edge through.

I spent a few months learning how to put a katana edge on my blades, if there is enough weight in the blade, mine will slice through a rope with just the force of the blade weight.

I like the kukri blade but it was designed for jungle fighting so it should do several things well. The parang is similar in that it is also a fighting knife design for jungle use.

There are four machete blade designs that I really like but these are more farm designed than fighting designed blades.
The SOG blade I have is best for hacking through small trees and branches or slicing through jungle foliage, it will also take a head off with a single swipe if needed.

For me, I choose the blade that is best suited for the job, what ever that job might be. (I have a fair number of blades to choose from)



Well said man.
 
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I love my ESEE "junglas" great edge retention. Big enough but not awkward. Great for down here in Florida.
And in the garden I have found many uses for a grass cycle. Especially when cutting back my ginger.
 
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