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What tree is this from  RSS feed

 
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Does anyone know what tree this branch came from
b284ea30b63522fe08a9cde7432234a2.0.jpg
[Thumbnail for b284ea30b63522fe08a9cde7432234a2.0.jpg]
 
pollinator
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It could be quite a few tree types because many have similar features. It helps if you can give us some information such as where you live (or rather where you found the branch); whether that is the way the living branches look on the tree, or whether that particular specimen has had the bark removed (which is how it appears) and perhaps even the conditions under which the tree was growing. Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) has reddish-purple heartwood, but it is not usually visible until the tree has died and weathered down to that layer. Sycamore trees (Platanus spp.) sometimes have such loose bark that it falls off before the tree is dead and they can exhibit a certain degree of colorful patterning beneath. The bottom line is that it isn't obvious from this single photo whether this is a dead and dry, or merely peeled branch without a bit more information. Can you tell us more?
 
Courtney Dos Santos
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I live in southern Alberta. I found the branch in the river, I was hoping to put it into my aquarium. That is it after being boiled approx 1 hour. It also has black that scrapes off quite easily.
 
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I'll take a guess at cottonwood.  Just going by your location and where it was found.  I've seen cottonwood have that coloration on branches before, but this is just a guess.  Hard to tell without bark or leaves.
 
Deb Stephens
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Walt Chase wrote:I'll take a guess at cottonwood.  Just going by your location and where it was found.  I've seen cottonwood have that coloration on branches before, but this is just a guess.  Hard to tell without bark or leaves.



Sycamore and cottonwood are similar trees, so I would agree it is possible. Boiling it doesn't help with the ID either though because it may have changed the color significantly. It would definitely have been easier to ID with leaves, bark and before boiling.
 
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What are the trees common to Alberta that could look like that branch? The first step in tree id is usually to find out what species are living in that area naturally.
If you had not boiled it you could have done a wood smell test by taking off a thin section of the larger connect, Eastern cedar is a well known scent (it's the wood in cedar closets and cedar chests).
trees of Alberta Canada  This is from the Canadian Government and is a poster of the trees native to The province of Alberta

My best guess is that your branch is not a pine but a juniper of which the eastern red cedar is one of the best known and miss named species.
The cotton wood is not a tree found in Canada as far as I have been able to find out. I also doubt it would be a Sycamore for the same reason, both Cottonwood and Sycamore are usually found much further south.

Redhawk
 
Courtney Dos Santos
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I'll have to look into what type of trees are in the area. Just at work right now..
The top right part of the branch has not been boiled yet.
Unfortunately it had no bark or leaves when I grabbed it.
I pulled it out of a half frozen inlet, so it was already waterlogged. It also has no smell to it
I guess my biggest concern is how to tell if its rotten, I don't want to kill any of my fishes (buying one will cost upwards of $60 and I think that's a little ridiculous for a stick lol)
 
Bryant RedHawk
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you can use a pen knife or paring knife to check for rot, the blade tip will sink in easily.

The photo looks like a sound stick and the white wood surrounding the red heart wood is very much eastern red cedar looking.

The fat end of the branch would have fairly wide ring spacing if it is a ERC branch and a fresh cut would be quite purplish red.
 
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