Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Parsnips

 
Posts: 16
Location: Rittman, OH
5
dog chicken bike
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was prepping a row in my garden for potatoes yesterday. The adjacent row had been an abject failure last season. I planted parsnips early spring and didn't see anything growing during the season, so I just let the row get weedy and dismissed it. I was contemplating whether I would use the row this season and looking at all the tall weeds, when I notice a few green items. At first I thought they were Queen Anne's lace, which starts early around here. But then I saw that they were parsnips! One was looking pretty fat, so I dug it up, picture attached. I can't tell how fat the others are, but I was a bit shocked by this, considering I planted the seeds a year ago. I was wondering if this is normal for parsnips? I know they have a long time to maturity, but this one (and the others) somehow made it through NE Ohio winter intact.
Parsnip.jpg
[Thumbnail for Parsnip.jpg]
 
Posts: 82
Location: mid Ohio, 40.318626 -83.766931
3
dog solar homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
very nice, I have been told of other people in the area growing them into the winter also.
 
garden master
Posts: 2705
Location: West Tennessee
802
cat purity trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most everything I direct sow outside has volunteers germinate six months to a year later. My parsnips do that, so does my lettuce, carrots, beets, spinach, melons, parsley, cilantro, etc. The conditions weren't right for those individual seeds to germinate when sowed, and when conditions did become right, they sprouted.
 
Posts: 137
Location: Maritimes , Eastern Canada
10
kids forest garden fish trees food preservation pig wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Second year parsnip. Perfectly normal in northern climes. You can eat them now, although woody. These will go to seed, much like second year onion also does.

In our area a lot of old timers would cover parsnips with straw or boughs to help protect these over wintering roots. They are notably sweet - to be savoured. and if you want seeds , just let them grow out. They should bolt about 1 july/ longest days.
 
Posts: 93
Location: Fryslân, Netherlands
33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They don't germinate easily, parsnip seeds, and very slowly. In a weedy spot they can easily get lost.
Letting them bolt is a good idea with parsnip, because then you can save a nice big pack of seeds and have enough to sow a bit thicker. The seeds don't last is what I've heard, and need to be used the following season. Look for a cleaner patch to sow them.
Your parsnip still looks very young, I'm not sure it would be woody, but I've never harvested a parsnip in this time of year.
 
Think of how stupid the average person is. And how half of them are stupider than that. - Carlin But who reads this tiny ad?
skiddable shower
https://permies.com/t/39038/permaculture-projects/skiddable-shower
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!