• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Mike Barkley
  • Christopher Shepherd

Hot Bed, No Manure.

 
Posts: 104
Location: Sudbury ON, Canada
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in the city (one that does not allow chickens) yet I'd like to use a hot bed this spring.  My neighbors, and my wife (and probably the local by-law enforcement) would not appreciate me bringing in a pile of manure.  So I'll just try to use my regular compost (mostly kitchen scraps and yard waste) in place of manure, any special considerations?  Special additives needed?
 
gardener
Posts: 6748
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1458
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To use compost as the heat for a hot bed you need it to heat up pretty fast, that would be the only real consideration.
Coffee grounds do well for increasing the Nitrogen level for a good heat up.
 
gardener
Posts: 3636
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
490
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pee.
 
pollinator
Posts: 864
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
247
duck trees chicken cooking wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Grass clippings heat up faster than anything else in my experience.
 
Posts: 141
Location: Appalachian Mountains
46
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Plantain leaves are an activator for compost, so are high in nitrogen.  I'm talking about broadleaf plantain, not bananas, although banana leaves should work too.  
 
gardener
Posts: 1774
Location: Los Angeles, CA
517
hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes to all the above . . . coffee grounds are wonderful, pee, grass clippings, etc.  You'll need some browns if you are adding too many grass clippings as they'll start to stink if they're not mixed with some sawdust or shredded paper or dried leaves.

My addition to the list: comfrey.  When I go around and harvest it all, I get about a cubic yard of comfrey leaves.  Within 2 weeks, it's all gone --- it decomposes super fast.  But it's a compost activator and his high in both nitrogen and water, which are necessary for the heat you desire.
 
This guy is skipping without a rope. At least, that's what this tiny ad said:
Permaculture Voices 1, 2 and 3 - all 117 hours of video!
https://permies.com/t/voices123
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic