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Help needed on hulling pseudograins: Amaranth

 
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I have grown Amaranth successfully in upstate New York, USA, getting a very high yield per plant. However, I have not found it easy to dehull.  I cut the stalks and hung in a shed to dry, as the fall is rainy here, and the heads are quite full. After drying I rubbed them against a strainer to separate the seeds from the head but most of the seed still covered with spiky hulls that are painful to rub. In other words, they are still not ready for winnowing.  Any suggestions as to how to remove these hulls?  Would Quinoa be easier to hull?
 
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Quinoa is very easy. So is wheat. So is sorghum. Supposedly pearl millet too, but not all millets. Supposedly hulless oats, but not all oats. When I grow barley and sunflowers and got to hulling them for flour, I stuck it in the blender and pulsed. Then I was able to winnow fairly easy, but I didn't care if it was whole. With the sunflower I used water to winnow (chaff floats), and barley I used wind, but left some chaff for a whole wheat type flour because some hulls were too stubborn. Good luck!
 
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There is still hope that someone with your experience will see this thread.  While we wait, can I suggest an experiment?  I did search for how to hull buckwheat. It's the grain I think of for difficult to hull. I found http://thesuburbanjungle.blogspot.com/2015/07/the-best-way-to-hull-buckwheat-by-hand.html?m=1. It has a couple if novel suggestions and if you are willing/able to use electricity then she m8ght be dropping enough hints to find even more options.
 
Amit Enventres
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Excuse my absent mindedness. I just went through my seed collection to plant my warm weather stuff and rediscovered that I successfully grew and hulled amaranth two years ago. I remember not using specialty equipment, so perhaps your issue has to do with variety or harvest timing? Lamb's quarter,  a relative of amaranth has hard to hull seeds and shows up whereever I have seedling failures... just another thought.
 
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