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What kind of bricks are these?  RSS feed

 
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I got these from an outdoor fireplace demolition.  

They look like same/similar material as cinderblocks.

How are the heat-shock handling properties of these bricks?

Can I used them as a base under firebricks, to save on firebricks?


Pictures attached.   
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Unknown brick
20180526_213539.jpg
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Unknown brick with glove for scale
 
pollinator
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Those look like firebricks to me, but I'm certainly not an expert. The ones we have are yellowish-tan and have a groove on one side and a corresponding ridge on the other side so that they can be fitted together in the same way you would fit tongue and groove boards. Do yours have a ridge on the other side? Also, firebricks tend to be pretty heavy compared to regular clay bricks.
 
Tyrone Slothrop
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Deb Stephens wrote:Those look like firebricks to me, but I'm certainly not an expert. The ones we have are yellowish-tan and have a groove on one side and a corresponding ridge on the other side so that they can be fitted together in the same way you would fit tongue and groove boards. Do yours have a ridge on the other side? Also, firebricks tend to be pretty heavy compared to regular clay bricks.



My firebricks are yellow-tan as well.  These are cinderblock-grey.    Flat on other side.


 
Deb Stephens
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I just had a thought. We dismantled an old glass kiln once and it had huge slabs of a material that was sort of like massive firebricks in it but they weren't the usual color. We figured they must have had some sort of insulative application. Could those be a mixture of clay with something fire-resistant and yet lightweight and insulative--like vermiculite or glass beads, etc.? Have you tried just googling firebrick images to see if you can find something similar?
 
Tyrone Slothrop
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Deb Stephens wrote:I just had a thought. We dismantled an old glass kiln once and it had huge slabs of a material that was sort of like massive firebricks in it but they weren't the usual color. We figured they must have had some sort of insulative application. Could those be a mixture of clay with something fire-resistant and yet lightweight and insulative--like vermiculite or glass beads, etc.? Have you tried just googling firebrick images to see if you can find something similar?



Yes.   Everything was variations of yellow-tan bricks.

I think what I've got is cinderblock... More fire tolerant than clay, but not as much as firebrick.      I'll used it where a second layer, not directly fire contacting, is required.

 
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How much do they weigh?
 
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An important diagnostic factor, as mentioned above, is how heavy the bricks are. Do they feel like dense firebrick? Do they feel almost feather-light?
If there are any cracked corners or surfaces, what does the raw surface look like?


If what you have is cinderblock, or cement block, it is far less fire-tolerant than clay brick. It would still be fine for a backup layer that will not be exposed to direct heating.
 
Eric Thomas
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And the dimensions, knowing the density would go a long way to id'ing the material.  Were the bricks between the house structure and the back of the fireplace or flue?
 
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