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Which prunus are availbale in Australia + were can I find bitter almonds?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1360
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
16
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Hi to all Aussies, the only supplier of bitter almond trees doesn't have any for sale this year. I could try seeds, but where can I find them? All prunus is prohibited entry.
Then there are some interesting prunus species maybe to use directly or to graft on (not that I would be an expert on that). The reason I want to play with them is that they are small and easy to net.
Are trees somewhere? In case there are, can any cherry be grafted on any wild cherry? It is all about tiny backyards and bad bad cockatoos (and other birds). I have the info from PFAF and only one of them seems to be good eating.
The species are:
Prunus besseyi is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.2 m, apparently good eating
Prunus japonica is an evergreen Shrub growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 1.5 m (5ft). apparently fair eating
Prunus pedunculata is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2 m (6ft 7in), apparently tastes terrible so for grafting only
Prunus pumila is a deciduous Shrub growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in), apparently terrible eating
Prunus fruticosa is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1 m (3ft 3in)terrible eating too
Prunus cerasus frutescens is a deciduous Tree growing to 1 m (3ft 3in), terrible eating
Prunus bifrons is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.8 m (6ft), terrible eating
Prunus prostrata is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1 m (3ft 3in), terrible eating
Prunus humilis is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.5 m (5ft), fair eating
Prunus gracilis is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.2 m (4ft) terrible eating
Prunus tenella is a deciduous Shrub growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 1.5 m (5ft), terrible eating
Prunus tomentosa is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 2 m (6ft)., terrible eating
Prunus glandulosa is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) by 1 m (3ft 3in) at a medium rate, terrible eating
Prunus andersonii is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.8 m (6ft), poor eating


 
gardener
Posts: 1463
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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I'm curious why you want to grow bitter almonds. Please tell!

In my experience, the seeds of apricots with bitter seeds are much like bitter almonds. They have amygdalin that can be boiled off. Most apricots have bitter seeds, don't they? And then you'd get an edible fruit as well as the kernel. But I guess an actual bitter almond tree would produce a lot more of the seeds than an apricot tree would.
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 1360
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Actually yes, you don't really need the bitter almond. There's one supplier here. But he is always out of stock.
 
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