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New Video on Youtube. Interested in feedback.  RSS feed

 
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Location: Nicoya, Costa Rica
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OK, check out this video. Gonna make some pop corn while waiting for the comments.

 
pollinator
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His myths are only a myth because he assumes they should be applied anywhere. If we apply that standard to big ag, we would myth not to apply lime prior to seeding cause some areas don't need it. "Observing" is ommitted and thats a critical mistake.

Comparing big ag to permaculture. I dont think Pauls vision is 5000 acre permie farms, but smaller farms feeding smaller amounts of people. Without this distinction,  his views may be rock solid but come from a narrow scope.

Perrenial systems cant feed the masses. The wheat industry could give way to a chestnut or pecan flour industry. It seems logical to me. Think about the impact that would have just on the yearly tillage, herbicides, and petroleum use from annual cropping.


 
pollinator
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bee forest garden fungi hugelkultur cooking rabbit trees urban wofati
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Hi Sergio.

I think I agree with many of the points made, essentially where he describes situations where people are choosing the wrong permacultural tool for their specific situations.

I think, though, that he's got a serious agriculture first problem that's keeping him from thinking outside the box on some of the issues he's seeing as problems.

The whole monocropping thing bothers me. They're using a machine about 18" wide, and so the block-planted rows are that width. There's nothing keeping them from alternating parallel block rows with one another, such that block rows of onions are alternated with crops whose pest species can't tolerate onion. You can do polyculture with block row plantings.

I think I am turned off a bit by the confrontational, judgemental language, which only peripherally connects with the message.

I also think that this guy and some like him might like to sit a while with our Dr. Redhawk.

-CK
 
gardener
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some may not be happy about this...






My response to Curtis Stones' "What Permaculture Got Wrong... Dispelling Five Common Myths"
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
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I loved the video. Spot on, for my money.

I think that I have to look in again on swale systems versus keyline plowing, but a lot of what is said makes sense, and much of what is covered looks a lot like how I am planning to approach matters.

I have no issues with reimagining hydrology and creating microclimate-changing earthworks, but I agree wholeheartedly with some of the conclusions arrived at, about making great market garden systems resilient and focusing on soil building and health being a crucial step forward.

I liked the line about there being no vegan ecosystems out there, not as a crass reason to exploit animals in the worst way possible, but just to stress that there are concrete benefits to integrating animals even if there's little to no cash flow derived from their presence, if they're not being harvested in any way.

I think that I need to do more practicum vis a vis market gardening.

-CK
 
Weeds: because mother nature refuses to be your personal bitch. But this tiny ad is willing:
DIY solar dehydrator - have you built one?
https://permies.com/t/90672/DIY-solar-dehydrator-built
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