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Is this a pawpaw  RSS feed

 
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We just moved to a 35 acre homestead in Northern vermont. I've picked up 10 pawpaw seedlings that I'm trying my luck at at the border of some of our woods. I was scouting our woods the other day and spotted this tree that had a striking resemblance to pawpaw. Any ideas on what it might be if not pawpaw?
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Posts: 61
Location: SW Ohio
9
chicken duck fish forest garden fungi cooking tiny house trees
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Just did a quick image search on pawpaw foliage and to my eye they don't appear to be similar, but I've never had the chance to examine pawpaw in person. I was super excited and hopeful that what you had found was pawpaw. Awesome though that you already have seedlings! I'm definitely going to incorporate pawpaw into my food forest too.
The main difference I see in the leaves is that with the pawpaw leaves, they have very strong symmetry with the lines coming from the center, where in your pictures the lines appear to alternate slightly, the pawpaw leaves have a very distinct shape that very smooth and your leaves are kind of similar, but not quite. The pawpaw leaves in the search also appear glossier, thicker and larger than the ones in your photo, as well as being grouped in larger clusters than the ones I saw in your photos. So my guess is... as much as I wish you had found a pawpaw tree... probably not.
 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: North Carolina, USA Zone 7b
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Congratulations on your new property!    Ditto Sarah.   Here's my 4 yr old Collins Select pawpaw.   You can see how symmetrical and flat the leaves are and some are up to 12" long.   Sorry!

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Posts: 29
Location: Western WA
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Looks like a species of Ash to me!
 
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The compound leaf is the easiest character to rule out pawpaw.  The leaf does resemble ash, but it appears to have alternate branching (not the leaflets, but the whole compound leaf) which rules out ash. Don't know what it is, but not pawpaw or ash.
 
Posts: 2
Location: Vancouver BC
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Maybe look at the family of Hickory treeshttps://www.wikihow.com/Identify-Hickory-Trees
 
Russell Apotheker
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Thanks all! It doesn't appear to be ash or hickory. Hickory leaves appear to all have serrated edges, but these leaves appear smooth all around and are quite large. Any other ideas? It a stumping me and I usually am quite good at sleuthing plants.
 
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An app I have on my phone (Picture This) says it's Green Ash. The app is not always accurate though but so far it's better than other plant ID apps I've tried. Good luck. Congrats on the new property. I'd love to live in VT someday.
 
Sarah Koster
Posts: 61
Location: SW Ohio
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I used this tool:
https://www.ourvermontwoods.org/topic/tree-identification
I wasn't sure about the last question since I couldn't examine the tree myself, but the result it gave me was boxelder or ashleaf maple. However upon further investigation, the leaves of these don't look quite like what's in your pictures... but like W Valler said it could be ash. Different ash varieties have different looking leaves, so I wouldn't rule it out.
Also the leaves are definitely NOT alternating, they're opposite one another on the stem. I think someone may have been looking at the pawpaw pictures when they said that.
 
David Linden
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If you look at the second picture from the top, down along the stem it appears that the leaves are alternate in arrangement.  The picture is poor, so I could be mistaken. The leaves at the tip of the twig seem to be opposite, but there is some discrepancy between the two. The leaflets don't count, only the compound leaves as a whole.
 
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I garden in California, but have a fondness for east coast trees/shrubs.  I have planted several Pawpaws and can tell you that is not one - Pawpaw leaves are obovate (wider near the tip) and your leaf is ovate.  Also, that is a compound leaf, i.e., what you are holding in your hand are 3 - 7 leaflets.  While the leaflets are opposite, the LEAVES are alternate.  Does kind of look like something in the hickory family, but as someone else pointed out, not serrate.  I'm not that into Ash, but they do have compound leaves.  A good clue will be what kind of flower/fruit does it make?  Much easier to identify that way.  Ash produces a samara, much like a maple. 
 
Posts: 78
Location: Zone 9, CA
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Looks like a pecan tree to me.
 
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Location: Guadalajara, Mexico (Zone 9b)
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It is definitely an Ash tree, I've got experience with these species.
 
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