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Does anyone eat Garlic bulbils?

 
Posts: 125
Location: Mansfield, Ohio Zone 5b percip 44"
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In my garden I grow hardneck garlic to store and break off the scapes to use. But in my Zone 2 and beyond I plant garlic around for diversity and let it grow wild. Now all the scapes have turned to seed. I eat the seeds sometimes but was wondering if anyone else uses them. I was thinking of drying them out and grinding them into like a garlic powder. Thoughts? The seeds have a strong garlic taste. I am thinking the seeds would have a longer shelf life than garlic but not sure about the nutritional value.
 
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Location: Central NY, Eastern Edge of Oneida Co. ,Town of Trenton
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I have heard of using the bulbets in pesto. They may work well in making garlic oil because you wouldn't have to peal them. And I have used them in a few dinners, in general they were milder than the garlic I had. Every time I tried to save them the garlic cloves would last much longer but I was using soft neck garlic
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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We use the bulbils for seasoning some dishes.
On clove planted garlic we pull and use the scapes for some dishes, we also have Egyptian Walking Onions and we do the same with them.
I plan to start two new beds of EWO (the Egyptian walking onion) by using the scapes when they are diving to the soil (this is the right time to create a new bed of this onion because it mimics their natural way of spreading).
I usually gather the seed garlic and grow it out to full size garlic, this does take two years to accomplish but it allows me to have two garlic crops going at the same time and the bulbil grown garlic tends to be larger at harvest with the same flavor (I grow two one German and one Italian).
 
Posts: 107
Location: Southeast Arizona, Latitude 31, Zone 8A, Cold Semi-Arid, USGS Ecoregion 79a
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With apologies for dragging this thread in a slightly different direction, I just bought my first Egyptian Walking Onion plant (Allium proliferum, right?). I'm very excited! I've been wanting to try these for years. The nice plant seller at the farmer's market included a 6-page information sheet on them, which is fantastic. But Bryant RedHawk, is there anything else you can think of off the top of your head that we should keep in mind about growing them? Bulbils are the same as topsets, right?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Beth, yes the scape terminates in a bulbil, the scape stem will bend over so the bulbil touches the soil and then it will set roots and break way becoming another plant.

Allium proliferum is draught sensitive, so just be sure their soil doesn't dry out for any extended period of time.
Also do keep the weeds away from the bulbs, they don't do well with competing plants.

Redhawk
 
Beth Wilder
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Location: Southeast Arizona, Latitude 31, Zone 8A, Cold Semi-Arid, USGS Ecoregion 79a
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Excellent information, thank you so much, Redhawk!
 
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I tried 3 or 4 times to grow garlic in my garden but somehow it never grew, it died every time. So, now I don't grow it anymore.
 
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Beth, be sure to give them plenty of space so when the bulbil bends over it has some space to grow.  DH put tomatoes with mine. The vines crowded the onions so much that I don't think the bulbil had anywhere to find a new home.
 
Beth Wilder
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Thanks, Anne! We transplanted them the other day and I think/hope they have enough room!

Mary, where are you/what type of climate? I didn’t know there was anywhere garlic wouldn’t thrive, at least if it got a little water and nutrients. It has always seemed like a particularly hearty and hands-off plant. But — although we’ve intended to — we haven’t grown it yet here without a well. We’ll plant it this fall and see.
 
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