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Herbal Remedys for Food Poisoning .. Any Suggestions?

 
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Until a few days ago I had never had any food related issues such as food poisoning or salmonella and didn't know anyone else that had either.

So on Sunday I came down with terrible abdominal cramps.  There are only two food items that I ate that were not also eaten by others.  The last hamburger patty out of a frozen package of 18 patties and some yeast dinner rolls.

Really, neither seems something that would cause food poisoning.

This incident has made me aware of the fact that our medical kit may not have what is needed for a case of food poisoning and we are an hour from the nearest hospital.

Any recommendations?
 
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Something that's handy to keep in a kit are charcoal pills. They should assist in dealing with Food-Poisoning.

---

I've never tried milk-thistle, but it's supposed to be effective.

Not herbal, but since a lot of these illnesses are bacteria-based, I eat raw garlic. I'm pretty flexible in regards to the age of the food that I consume, so I imagine it must do something at the very least, as I can't really recall the last time I had food-poisoning symptoms. Just an idea: garlic bulbils last much longer than the bulbs, so putting a few in an annual medical kit might be possible.
 
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Jarret Hynd wrote:Something that's handy to keep in a kit are charcoal pills. They should assist in dealing with Food-Poisoning.



I was also going to suggest the activated charcoal. In addition, some slippery elm will help sooth it, and create a buffer through your intestines.

Edit to add: marshmallow root will also do it. The key is the mucilaginous coating - cattail also comes to mind.
 
Jarret Hynd
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Carla Burke wrote:
Edit to add: marshmallow root will also do it. The key is the mucilaginous coating - cattail also comes to mind.



Hmm, I've never heard of the mucilaginous effect for this use. So even something like common mallow should be able to help with food-poisoning. Same goes for flax seed.

 
Carla Burke
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Jarret Hynd wrote:Hmm, I've never heard of the mucilaginous effect for this use. So even something like common mallow should be able to help with food-poisoning. Same goes for flax seed.



The mucilage coats the linings of the digestive tract, soothes it, and promotes the expulsion of it's contents. It would be best taken an hour or two after the activated charcoal, so the a.c. has a chance to collect the toxins, before being expelled. Cinnamon is also incredibly mucilaginous, but I'm not sure of it's efficacy, in this application, since it's also a 'warm' spice. Not all mucillage is created equal. ;)
 
Anne Miller
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

I have activated charcoal though I feel the capsules would be better for other folks and children.

I can understand why marshmallow root would be very helpful.
 
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