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Zone 2B Homesteading  RSS feed

 
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Hi all, I've recently acquired a couple acres in zone 2B and want to setup a homestead. The property has a water source and is 90% forest. I've been reading and learning a lot and am very excited. I'm hoping some of you with experience in zone 2B can chime in with your experience and advice. I have 5000 questions but I'll try to ask them slowly and spaced apart.



 
Posts: 1802
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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forest garden solar
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I wonder how many hours of sunlight you get in the winter. If it is alot then maybe a lean-to greenhouse could be used.

If you have some native fish, maybe a pond.
If you have some native mammals you harvest the ones that come on your property.
You can also grow mushroom.
If you are near the sea, maybe harvest fish and sea-vegetables.

What did the natives, 500 yrs ago eat/harvest in your area?
 
Mark Roberts
Posts: 18
homestead trees
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S Bengi wrote:I wonder how many hours of sunlight you get in the winter. If it is alot then maybe a lean-to greenhouse could be used.

What did the natives, 500 yrs ago eat/harvest in your area?




Thanks for the reply. In the dead of winter the sun rises at about 8am and sets about 6pm, so only around 10 hours of sun per day. For food production my plan so far is twofold:

1. The entire front of the house will have double pane thermal insulated south facing windows and I'll setup a container gardening system supplemented by grow lights for the winter months in front ogf those windows, I've been experimenting growing leafy greens, tomatoes and a few other veggies using only LED grow lights in my basement and it works very well. Then a hoop style greenhouse made with pipe (PVC doesn't last in the sun and is a waste of money in my opinion). For protein I figure ducks and goats make the most sense. My only concern there is producing feed.
2. My land is surrounded by endless miles of forest for hunting and there are many lakes within range for fishing. 

I'm not sure what the natives did for local veggies, I plan on finding and talking to local farmers in the area and see what crops work well. I currently live on the other side of the country so will not be able to do that part until I get there.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1802
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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forest garden solar
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When you said 2b/3a I was thinking Alaska Arctic Circle cold with only 3hrs of sunlight in the winter and only 3months with no risk of snow.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daytime#/media/File:Hours_of_daylight_vs_latitude_vs_day_of_year_cmglee.svg
But with 10hrs of sunlight it seems that you are only 33N of the equator. Are you in Wyomin/Colorado?

I hope that you are able to grow alot of mushroom in your basement (Oyster+Wine Cap).
Just hang some bags filled with woodchip/straw from the basement celling aka vertical growing.
You can also grow vegetables/herbs vertically too in your basement aka Zip Tower. While it is very energy intensive.
I think it is still better than shipping vegetable from the other side of the country or the other side of the world.


 
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Location: Saskatchewan
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I am also in 2b growing vegetables in winter is very hard and energy intensive. The light we get here is a low quality in winter and closer to 8hrs per day. The lack of light is not the issue it's the fact that its -20 for months with periods of -40 in there, it is just hard to keep a growing area heated unless it's in your living area. Natives traditionally ate dried berries and roots all winter and the old timers lived on meat and potatoes.
I've found growing feed for ducks and chickens a challenge and still working on it though I've settled on keeping geese.
 
Mark Roberts
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S Bengi wrote:When you said 2b/3a ...Are you in Wyomin/Colorado?


I hope that you are able to grow alot of mushroom in your basement (Oyster+Wine Cap).



I'm in zone 2B according to this chart.

I'm planning on trying to grow mushrooms next, all the reading I've done suggests they're fairly easy to grow. Thanks for the advice  :)

 
Mark Roberts
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Marc Dube wrote: it is just hard to keep a growing area heated unless it's in your living area.

I've found growing feed for ducks and chickens a challenge and still working on it though I've settled on keeping geese.



I was planning on a rocket mass heater for the greenhouse.

How do you find keeping geese? Would love some more info. How much room do they need, what do you feed them, do you grow your feed or purchase...
 
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i am starting a similar project.. same zone.
plan to make more than one greenhouse
one which would be a pit tunnel with ground loop
one which would be much more insulated(using mostly earth) to keep a warm environment throughout the winter
ground loop, jean pain, water heating etc... every trick i can throw at it
figure a solar set up would have to occupy some of the internal space as well (for running fans etc)
i have lots of ideas but i have not jumped into it yet as i think i need to rent heavy equipment for earth moving
no money at the moment.. thats ok ... no mortgage either
 
Marc Dube
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Location: Saskatchewan
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How do you find keeping geese? Would love some more info. How much room do they need, what do you feed them, do you grow your feed or purchase...


The geese pretty well take care of them selves I don't feed them or care for them during the growing months. I have to take a little care that the don't get into the neighboring fields. They range around the yard spending time in the pond and the front yard keeping the grass short. They roam the orchard eating grass and all fallen or low hanging fruit. In the winter months I pen them up and feed them whole grains.
 
Mark Roberts
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House Foundation

Pouring a slab is not an option for me. I'm building a 1000sq ft south facing rectangle and am trying to figure out the best option for a foundation. After leveling I was thinking making a perimeter of cinder blocks (to frame off of), then the middle full of tires filled in with field stone, gravel and sand to form a solid mass. I'm wondering if that will create a cheap and effective mass / insulation to retain heat in the floor throughout the winter. I would also cement in corner posts for stability against heaving.

Thoughts? Anyone tired a similar foundation?
 
Stinging nettles are edible. But I really want to see you try to eat this tiny ad:
Rocket Oven plan download
https://permies.com/t/rocket-oven-plans
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