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Is unripe (astringent) persimmon fruit useful as a beauty product?

 
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I have a persimmon tree with fruit growing on only one half of the tree.  The fruit is beautiful and astringent. Has anyone used the gallic or tannic acid in the persimmon for beauty products? The persimmon has wonderful health properties and the pucker is so strong, certainly there is an anti-wrinkle effect (maybe), ( I hope).
I has been used as ink in other cultures so I am not looking to stain my face just smooth my skin.
 
pollinator
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First, if your persimmons are hard and astringent, they are not ripe. Wait for them to get soft enough to fall off the tree before eating.

Second, you don't need to rub them on your face to prevent wrinkles -- just EAT them. You may want to read this article on persimmons ... Benefits of Persimmons

Here is a pertinent snippet ...
"Persimmons are rich in a number of vitamins, specifically vitamin A, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and cryptoxanthin. These vitamins function as antioxidants in the body to reduce oxidative stress and prevent signs of premature aging, like wrinkles, age spots, Alzheimer’s disease, fatigue, loss of vision, muscles weakness, and a number of other conditions."

 
lin sam
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My persimmon tree has fruit only on one side of the tree. Does anyone know why?
 
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The usual culprits for any trees are:
Waterspouts/Rootstock/Multigraft
It is possible that it was grafted and rootstock somehow started growing and isn't producing 'yet' or some other type of watersprout.
Late Frost
They tend to awaken super late in the season so I don't think a late frost killed the fruit buds on the windy side of the tree.
Trunk Damage
Maybe the tree trunk got damaged, which could either force the damage side to fruit thinking it is going to die soon or not fruit if it is super damaged and can't get enough water/etc from the roots.

Or it could just be a young tree and one side has 3 fruits and the other doesn't have any???

 
Deb Stephens
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lin sam wrote:My persimmon tree has fruit only on one side of the tree. Does anyone know why?



Is this an American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) or one of the Asian varieties? (I ask because, assuming you live in the USA, the American persimmon is native and will not likely be grafted as someone mentioned.) Also, what sort of conditions occur where the tree is growing? By that I mean, is it in shade, sun, possibly a windy area? This is just a guess, but the side of the tree that has no fruit may be subjected to higher winds or could be in deep shade for much of the day -- adverse growing conditions might affect its fruit production. We could possibly be more helpful if we knew where you live -- what state and zone.
 
S Bengi
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Alot of the Jim Claypool American Persimmon trademark cultivars are grafted, self-fertile and seedless and offered by alot of nurseries.
https://onegreenworld.com/product/prairie-sun-2/
 
lin sam
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to Deb. I live in Los Angeles, Ca. The unproductive side is highest or tallest so it gets plenty of sun and less shade.  The fruit laden side is in a moderate sunlit area all day. The tree was pruned in June when I first moved to this location.
Fruit begin growing early summer.  It takes a long time for the fruit to ripen after they have reached a considerable size.  Squirrels and other animals climb the tree and enjoy the ripened ones.  The tree is the American tree.  Other trees in my backyard, (except the grapefruit), tangerine, apricots and mulberry have not produced new fruit since the pruning and  I have not watered nor has it rained significantly. Still the lemon and orange trees are producing well without watering.
 
S Bengi
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Alot of fruit trees actually make the fruit buds in the summer of the year before.
So if you come and cut off all of those fruit buds that turns into fruits, you will have no fruits.

I assume that the short side, didn't get pruned as badly and so some of it's fruiting buds survived.
Also because it wasn't pruned, it has less "water sprout" and so more energy went into fruit and less into vegetative growth.
In nature if a tree gets "pruned" by a grazing animal it invest more of it's energy to grow taller than the grazing animal and less into fruiting.


 
lin sam
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Wow! Bengi. You are so informed. Thank you. In this case the grazers are humans with clippers.
 
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