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What's the significance of ram's horns and other vortices?

 
Posts: 416
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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I've read that ram's horns vortices imply increased mixing and slower exit out of a riser vs a single vortex.  But what are the other implications? Do they occur at minimal temperatures, and speed of combustion?  Any other implications?

I had assumed that they implied that you were getting near complete combustion but this doesn't seem to be the case.  In this video from last night



I see large dual vortices at 2:45 but also smoke coming from the riser.  I'm guessing I've over fueled the fire.  And although I cut the wood 5 years ago from an old man pine ( 100 year old pine tree, with over 1 m diameter rounds - most of the tree is under my hugelkultur), it was still damp as I had it under a tarp to feed the insect life

So, far I haven't been able to find anyone who can make a secondary air feed for me ... the metal shop was busy, and the engineer who did my steel beam for the basement hasn't replied
 
steward
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Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
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I think the ram's horn just shows you how heated gases are moving, and good movement increases combustion.  If your fuel is less than dry, you're not going to get good combustion because a significant amount of the energy is going towards vaporizing the water content.
 
Graham Chiu
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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Sure, damp wood wastes heat by needing to first boil the water out so perhaps I'm seeing steam rather than smoke. I'll need to sniff the gases next time to see what they might be.
 
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