• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
  • Anne Miller
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Jocelyn Campbell
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Jay Angler

Overwintering kale roots: Deep cold winter temps.

 
pollinator
Posts: 1488
Location: RRV of da Nort
216
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As the temps drop for the year, we are wondering about saving kale plants from the garden (roots intact in the root cellar) for re-planting in the spring for seed collection.  Alternatively, we are toying with cutting the plants down to the ground, mulching heavily, and uncovering them in the spring for the same purpose.  Ideally if anyone in northern Minnesota/Wisconsin or Manitoba/Western Ontario of Canada has succeeded in doing either of these, I would be interested in hearing of your successes and failures.   Thanks!....
 
Posts: 121
Location: Council, ID
6
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in zone 5. Spring planted kale mostly dies in the winter, but late plantings - young plants - make it through just fine. They all flower in the spring. Plant any time from August on, maybe?
 
gardener
Posts: 6621
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1271
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In up state NY  fall planted kale grows most of the winter. When it's covered with snow fall it mostly goes dormant until the snow melts.

Wolf used to grow it in Alberta as a fall planting and harvested up to snow covering, then it would come back as soon as the snow was gone and the sun was out.

Redhawk
 
John Weiland
pollinator
Posts: 1488
Location: RRV of da Nort
216
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hmmmm....Fall planting as a possible factor here is interesting.  Normally all of our kale is spring planted and only this year did I put in one variety in late August.  It's puttering along with the unusually cold nights we've had and yet maybe has put on enough growth to test this out.  So I will make sure to keep some of the spring-planted roots/plants where they are and compare these to the late summer plantings.....with everybody getting a good layer of mulch for overwintering.  We are right around that 80" frost depth shown below, but it's probably also a factor of soil structure and moisture and duration of deep winter that impacts winter survival.  

Thanks for these responses.....will give it a go!
FrostDepth.JPG
[Thumbnail for FrostDepth.JPG]
 
J W Richardson
Posts: 121
Location: Council, ID
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off topic, sorry...I normally plant spinach as a fall crop for overwintering. (I have friends in zone 4 that do this too). I usually end up planting too late for fall use, but it has a nice long early spring season.
One plus is, the voles don’t like it much at all. They go for the lettuce first, then the kale, and I have never seen damage on the spinach. One way to avoid them might be to plant late enough so that you are overwintering seedlings rather than plants? Seedlings here, so far, seem pretty tough.
 
Getting married means "We're in love, so let's tell the police!" - and invite this tiny ad to the wedding:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/t/bootcamp
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic