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10 Myths about wofati, and Facts  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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I post this because I think there have to be at least 10 misunderstandings, rookie mistakes, or other things that could be clarified.  I think I understand the wofati now, but then again a few months ago I thought I understood the wofati, then found out I had some aspects completely wrong.  And about six months before that I was _sure_ I knew what a wofati was, etc.

So, here's one (and I hope this is really really accurate now):

MYTH: it's dug into the side of a hill

TRUTH: It's mostly above ground.  The "earth-integrated" thing means that you pile dirt on top of the roof, and that dirt has a clear path for every drop of rain that falls on it to get to the ground.  It may look somewhat like an underground house, therefore, and has the advantage of being invisible to the alien invaders' satellites, but it is built above the ground.  You can make it on a fairly gentle slope and you get the dirt from a nearby spot.


 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
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Here is one  question, I'll post more later, I had posted about wofatis, and I'll gather the answers I've gotten from people who've acutally seen them later when I have time:


does it have to be on a hill or on a slope?  if a slope, maybe "upslope" and "downslope" would be clearer?



 
pollinator
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Is this like the 10 types of people in the world, those that understand binary, and those that don't?  
 
gardener
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Truth: a wofati can be built on a slope or on flat land-the slope is not necessary.

Building by digging sub-grade into a slope is more of a Mike Oehler, "The $50 and up underground house" idea. The wofati per Paul is 80% Mike Oehler design principles, but digging sub-grade into the slope is one that is not included. It is still earth-integrated (which Oehler said would. be a better term for his design as well), in that soil is bermed against the walls and added to the roof.

 
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Mark Tudor wrote:Truth: a wofati can be built on a slope or on flat land-the slope is not necessary.

Building by digging sub-grade into a slope is more of a Mike Oehler, "The $50 and up underground house" idea. The wofati per Paul is 80% Mike Oehler design principles, but digging sub-grade into the slope is one that is not included. It is still earth-integrated (which Oehler said would. be a better term for his design as well), in that soil is bermed against the walls and added to the roof.



Mike didn't always dog into a slope either.  His book includes an example that I believe he called a "flat earth house". I don't remember for certain if that was the name,  but he gave an example with plans for building it.
 
pollinator
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I always thought the WOFATI Design was a little better...at least for me...because my soil is very thin here, at least where I want to put my home. This particular location has a great view, but being on a big hill, it gets slammed with wind. It does not seem like a big deal, but me and my wife hate it. On a winter day it literally can take your breath away.

We have a WOFATI plan that brings natural light from (2) sources into every room, gives us our view. but the WOFATI itself would keep the wind at bay.

That design is small however, so our plan is to stay in this Tiny House for 7 more years, then when it is just me, my wife and the youngest child, build the WOFATI and live there, renting this Tiny House out.


 
gardener
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Mark Tudor wrote:Truth: a wofati can be built on a slope or on flat land-the slope is not necessary.

Building by digging sub-grade into a slope is more of a Mike Oehler, "The $50 and up underground house" idea. The wofati per Paul is 80% Mike Oehler design principles, but digging sub-grade into the slope is one that is not included. It is still earth-integrated (which Oehler said would. be a better term for his design as well), in that soil is bermed against the walls and added to the roof.



I have discussed complications of flatland wofatis with Paul in the past. I think there are two main issues:

1) On flat ground (like where I live) you have to dig a huge hole in the ground somewhere on the property in order to be able to cover the structure with enough material. Less earth moving is required on a slope.

2) This is a big one. A wofati is a pole structure. Including its foundation. And it's made of untreated wood. It is much harder to keep those poles dry on flat ground than it is on sloped ground.
 
pollinator
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Some will disagree with me here, but it's for that reason, Shawn, that I suggest rammed-earth pillars as an option for flat land or otherwise lumberless wofati.

No, I have not yet had the opportunity to put it into practice, but if there's no appropriate lumber around, and the right types of sand, soil, and clay can be found, it might prove not only more structurally sound, but cheaper than hauling appropriate lumber to the site.

As to where to get the dirt cover, isn't that what ponds and earthworks are for?

-CK
 
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