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need help with mushroom ID

 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 1959
Location: mountains of Tennessee
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Found this growing on a tree stump. Diameter is 27.5 inches. Trying to learn more about the local mushrooms & mushrooms in general. Does anyone have any details they can share about this particular type? Could even be some other type of fungus.

fungi.jpg
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gardener
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I'd need some more details about the fungus; Is it gilled? are they straight or do they look wavy? Spore print color?
Do you have a local mushroom hunter club or is there one fairly close?
Sadly, there are many mushrooms that look like a lot of other mushrooms and the best bet is to find someone near you that can identify it.
Some even require a tissue sample under a microscope to be certain of the species.
 
Mike Barkley
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It's relatively flat. Bumpy but not what I'd call wavy. Haven't looked underneath to check gills yet. Doesn't seem the type to have gills though. It has a rather hard surface. Will be in that area working on firewood tomorrow. Weather permitting. Will check for gills & spore print color.

Still working on finding a local club or experienced mushroom person. Many types on this property. Some seem perfectly edible. Not something to take chances with though. Will probably wimp out on that adventure & just start cultivating a few known types for a long while.

Are chickens a reliable indicator of the safety of eating wild mushrooms?
 
steward
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I came across these in my woods recently this early spring. The caps are concave and look like they could hold a teaspoon of water. A unique feature I noticed is the gills under the cap continue down the stem. Any ideas, mushroom foragers?

wild-mushroom-1.jpg
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wild-mushroom-1-gills.jpg
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Bryant RedHawk
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Mike Barkley wrote:

Are chickens a reliable indicator of the safety of eating wild mushrooms?



Just because an animal species is not harmed does not indicate it is safe for human consumption.

Redhawk
 
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Mike, I suggest looking into the Trametes polypores. Possible Trametes elegans if it has a maze like pores. Go to mushroomexpert.com and look at the characteristics to see if they match.
 
Dennis Bangham
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James, yours looks like an old oyster mushroom well past it's prime. Again, check mushroomexpert.com
 
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