Win a copy of Straw Bale Building Details this week in the Straw Bale House forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Mike Barkley
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton

Citrus Pollination  RSS feed

 
Posts: 159
Location: North Coast Dominican Republic
17
forest garden tiny house trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Having looked around my neighborhood, I believe I am the only one with a grapefruit tree. I have little room, so I must choose my trees carefully. I am wondering how important it is to have a second grapefruit tree nearby for cross pollination?

Also, I am considering a second citrus, and need advice on what kind. My local friend recommends against sweet orange, because a disease recently devastated the sweet oranges in the area. The wild citrus in the pastures are mostly sour orange (which the locals use as a marinade, not for eating), and sweet lemon. How 'bout that? I live in a country where the lemons are sweet and the oranges sour! I thought about planting the tangelo, but I was reading about its pollination and I am unsure. The articles I read said that tangelos are not good at cross-pollinating each other, and recommended tangerines for pollination of tangelos. What the articles did not mention was whether the tangelo's other parent, the grapefruit, can be effective in pollination. As much as I like tangerines, most of them are a bit small for my liking; whereas tangelos taste like tangerines, but are bigger, at least the size of oranges.

Awaiting replies from experienced citrus growers.
 
Posts: 339
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
75
cat chicken fish forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking transportation trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most citrus are self fertile and don't need another tree to provide pollination. However a few require it for good fruit production.

I have a Tangelo and it fruits well all by itself - though likely pollinated by nearby lime and 'lemonade' trees.

After deciding what fruit you want, choose a variety that is self fertile - there's many choices.

Depending on where you live and availability, one citrus I'd suggest is the 'Lemonade' - it was developed in Australasia, tastes just like a lemonade drink and is really nice on a hot day.

Just remember they like regular feeding with compost/manure, even watering, a bit of trimming, and no competition from grass.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
243
forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Citrus can cross pollinate each other.  Plant any citrus you like near your grapefruit tree and both will benefit. If you are trying to produce seeds from a specific variety,  then this could be less undesirable.  You could produce seeds that carry mixed characteristics from both trees. The fruit holding those seeds will still be the same fruit.
 
Jason Hernandez
Posts: 159
Location: North Coast Dominican Republic
17
forest garden tiny house trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Casie Becker wrote: If you are trying to produce seeds from a specific variety,  then this could be less undesirable.  You could produce seeds that carry mixed characteristics from both trees.



The more research I do on citrus, the more apparent this becomes. I read up on some citrus species, that originated as a hybrid between two other species, which in turn originated as hybrids between yet other species. I begin to think all citrus are really just one big superspecies by now.
 
a wee bit from the empire
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!