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brand new, first time growing mushrooms.

 
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Hi, so I've never tried growing mushrooms before, so i'm trying my hand in this business haha. Since this is my first time, and I like them, I'm trying portobellas. I couldn't find much online about growing from store bought, except for mostly "DO NOT DO IT". But, I don't have much to use, and I also don't want to spend a lot on something I'm not sure of. I've looked online, and pretty much have come up with what I thought would work the best, since I had nothing to actually go off of haha.
So before I start to bore anyone, what I've done so far, is, I have an aluminum pan, like you'd use to hold food at a bbq. I cleaned it, and I put a layer of coconut husk first (since mushrooms need a good reliable source of moisture) I baked it in the oven, to try to kill off anything that might not be good for the mushroom growing process. Then, I wet the husk, to where it wasn't dripping wet, the right amount of moisture. I took the gills, and spread them around the substrate, and took the stalks, cut them up, and also spread those around. After that, I took used coffee grounds, (what I would believe to be already sterile, from the heat, being "cooked") I spread them over the top, but not completely covering everything. Most of the mushroom parts are mostly visible. I also have a clear plastic lid that goes on top, and once a day, I take it off, and fan the tray.
I started this, 4 days ago, (you probably know, I'm trying to get mycelium) but I started seeing what I hope, and believe to be what I'm looking for. On the third day, I started seeing a small, white, fuzzy substance coming from only about the center of the mushroom bits. There is nothing growing anywhere else, except the mushroom parts, not the substrate, also not on all the pieces yet, just a few. Now, from what i've read, that's good, what I want.
Again, I am totally brand new to this, so any information/tips, for any part of the process, would be awesome. I'm hoping, I don't get too much bad criticism, but its better than nothing haha.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1029
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I’ve tried to find good instructions for growing Agaricus sp too. No luck. I’d like to try growing A campestries and A bitorqus. I also can’t find spawn.
 
Posts: 4
Location: Netherlands and Cape Verde
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fungi urban greening the desert
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In my experience it's best to buy spawn and experiment with that. But indeed the big professional spawn suppliers do not deliver to homegrowers.

Tip: Contact a local mushroom farmer and see if you can buy one bag of spawn of him/her.
 
Posts: 182
Location: 7b desert southern Idaho
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I’m interested in how it works for you! I found lots of information on growing button mushrooms online. They are the same mushroom. It sounds like your mycelium is growing. I found mushrooms to be great to geek out on, but it was a big investment in time and money.
 
jerry jacobi
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I do just have 2 questions, if anyone might know. From what I've read, it sounds like its growing good, but it also looks like mold, is there any way to tell the difference? besides the "mold and mushrooms are practically the same thing" but I want to make sure its the right one.
Also, there's something going on with my substrate. It looks like its moving, almost like when you get dirt, and there's those little tiny ants in it. The only thing i can think of, is nematodes, but i didn't know if i could get those, and also, if that's what they actually are. i'd try to get a photo, but it'd be impossible, because they're pretty much microscopic.
 
Dennis Mitchell
Posts: 182
Location: 7b desert southern Idaho
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A photo would help to see if you have mold or mycelium. I only know oyster or winecap, but someone more experienced could give you a better understanding.
 
jerry jacobi
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Dennis Mitchell wrote:A photo would help to see if you have mold or mycelium. I only know oyster or winecap, but someone more experienced could give you a better understanding.



I would, but I'm on a laptop, and itd be a hassle to try and upload a photo for another source, that id have to take it from. maybe ill be able to get it to happen tomorrow, and I have more time to do it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 417
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Easiest way to grow mushrooms is on logs.  Since I am in an area where there are alot of bugs the cool and cold weather varieties (oyster and Shiitake) are my late fall and early spring crops. No bugs when it is cool.
 
Posts: 33
Location: Peotone, IL
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I've always wanted to give growing crimini mushrooms a try, but haven't gotten around to it. Commerically though, my concern would be that agaricus mushrooms like buttons and portabellas would be competing with low grocery store prices - at least in my area. The price per pound is really low due to low operational costs of those big automated factory farms.

You might be able to charge a higher price at the market for varieties like lion's mane, black poplar, or cordyceps. Those are a lot less common and people generally expect to pay a little more for an "exotic" produce item not found in stores near them.

Good luck, post cool pics!  
 
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