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Which wood for Tipi floor?

 
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We've ordered a big (10m diameter) tipi that we will live in for 1-2 years. I want to build a wooden platform inside. Part of this platform will be pallets that we have left. For the rest, which plates should I use? MFD is cheaper, but less strong than plywood. Which thickness do I need? Is 18mm enough? How far apart should the floor joists be?
 
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Why build for just a two year period. Just set it up and live in contact with the earth. It seems to be a waste of materials, and labor.
 
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Hi Philippe;
Yes I think the 18mm plywood is thick enough.  I would set the floor joists at 16" center as it is a small area. Or 24" would also work, although I would recommend you brace/strengthen the walking area's of your floor.

Putting an insulator down (even saw dust or wood chips ) will keep your feet warmer.

Are you bulding a Rocket mass Heater in your tipi ?  I know that I would...

 
Philippe Elskens
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thomas rubino wrote:Hi Philippe;
Yes I think the 18mm plywood is thick enough.  I would set the floor joists at 16" center as it is a small area. Or 24" would also work, although I would recommend you brace/strengthen the walking area's of your floor.

Putting an insulator down (even saw dust or wood chips ) will keep your feet warmer.

Are you bulding a Rocket mass Heater in your tipi ?  I know that I would...



Yes, we will build a Rocket mass heater. But we are in Lisbon, so I wasn't planning on putting down any insulation...
 
Philippe Elskens
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Dennis Mitchell wrote:Why build for just a two year period. Just set it up and live in contact with the earth. It seems to be a waste of materials, and labor.



We'll set it up at the foot of a hill, so I suspect that after some rainfall the earth will be quite moist.
It seems to me that it would become extremely dirty very quickly, no? With a platform, we could leave our shoes at the entrance and keep everything relatively clean inside.
Also, we're planning on building modular. So first we live in the tipi while we build a small building (a bathroom for example). Then we build a kitchen/living area. Only then we build a bedroom. And even after that it's likely that the tipi will be used for something, maybe even a children's room. But I'm definitely planning on keeping all costs as low as possible.
 
Dennis Mitchell
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Philippe Elskens wrote:

Dennis Mitchell wrote:Why build for just a two year period. Just set it up and live in contact with the earth. It seems to be a waste of materials, and labor.



We'll set it up at the foot of a hill, so I suspect that after some rainfall the earth will be quite moist.
It seems to me that it would become extremely dirty very quickly, no? With a platform, we could leave our shoes at the entrance and keep everything relatively clean inside.
Also, we're planning on building modular. So first we live in the tipi while we build a small building (a bathroom for example). Then we build a kitchen/living area. Only then we build a bedroom. And even after that it's likely that the tipi will be used for something, maybe even a children's room. But I'm definitely planning on keeping all costs as low as possible.



I get by with a rug covered canvas, which also protects from water, but if you are reusing the flooring you will want a rudimentary foundation. Keep the wood separate from soil, masonry, or stone.
A cheap temporary construct would be to lay down pallets over plastic, then cover with 9/16’s osb, then cover with rug. Then you can reuse the osb, plastic, and pallets in another project.
 
pollinator
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Earthen floors are extremely low cost, can be kept from getting moist, and are not dirty(ie, not prone to have loose dirt particles detach and become free dirt), if they are made correctly.

I can't post a link right now, but searching this site for "Earthen Floor" will reveal multiple threads detail how-to, and why it's a good alternative.


That being said, I think wood floors are great, and my they would be my choice as well
 
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Dennis Mitchell wrote:

Philippe Elskens wrote:

Dennis Mitchell wrote:Why build for just a two year period. Just set it up and live in contact with the earth. It seems to be a waste of materials, and labor.



We'll set it up at the foot of a hill, so I suspect that after some rainfall the earth will be quite moist.
It seems to me that it would become extremely dirty very quickly, no? With a platform, we could leave our shoes at the entrance and keep everything relatively clean inside.
Also, we're planning on building modular. So first we live in the tipi while we build a small building (a bathroom for example). Then we build a kitchen/living area. Only then we build a bedroom. And even after that it's likely that the tipi will be used for something, maybe even a children's room. But I'm definitely planning on keeping all costs as low as possible.



I get by with a rug covered canvas, which also protects from water, but if you are reusing the flooring you will want a rudimentary foundation. Keep the wood separate from soil, masonry, or stone.
A cheap temporary construct would be to lay down pallets over plastic, then cover with 9/16’s osb, then cover with rug. Then you can reuse the osb, plastic, and pallets in another project.



Yes, osb on top of pallets was what I was thinking of! Hadn't even considered plastic underneath...
I'm hesitant to putting down rugs as we'll live with 2 big dogs, 2 cats and 2/3 people so those things will just gather dust!
 
Philippe Elskens
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Dustin Rhodes wrote:Earthen floors are extremely low cost, can be kept from getting moist, and are not dirty(ie, not prone to have loose dirt particles detach and become free dirt), if they are made correctly.

I can't post a link right now, but searching this site for "Earthen Floor" will reveal multiple threads detail how-to, and why it's a good alternative.


That being said, I think wood floors are great, and my they would be my choice as well



Hadn't even thought of an earthen floor (although that is our plan in the permanent structures)!
So just install on top of a plastic barrier for moist?
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