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Hybrid hazelnut source

 
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First of, thank all of you that posted dismal reviews of Badgersett.  There is a very good chance you saved me some hard-earned money, and I appreciate it.  Seeing that they are not reliable, is there someone else people would recommend for the same type trees/bushes?  I'm mainly looking for hybrid hazels, but I'm looking for other productive nut trees as well.  I have already planted a number of native hazelnuts for wildlife, I'm just looking for a dozen or so really productive nut trees to add to my blossoming food forest.

Thank you.
 
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Trace, hazels will strike from cuttings pretty easily, but you may have missed the season for doing this. Another thing that you could try is grafting. If you already have or can get access to the hybrid varieties you want, they're one of the easiest nuts to graft with a simple whip and tongue, cleft, or bud method. Rootstocks could be any robust variety that sends up lots of root suckers.

If you do graft hazels, do it low down and mark the branch, as you will want to prune out suckers later when they develop.

[EDIT] One thing to add: Graft onto root suckers in place, let them grow for the entire season, then dig them this winter and plant them out. You'll get better results than if you start with freshly dug rootstock.
 
Trace Oswald
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Phil Stevens wrote:Trace, hazels will strike from cuttings pretty easily, but you may have missed the season for doing this. Another thing that you could try is grafting. If you already have or can get access to the hybrid varieties you want, they're one of the easiest nuts to graft with a simple whip and tongue, cleft, or bud method. Rootstocks could be any robust variety that sends up lots of root suckers.

If you do graft hazels, do it low down and mark the branch, as you will want to prune out suckers later when they develop.



Grafting is on my list of things I would really like to try this summer.  On apple trees alone I could save a ton of money.

The season for cuttings is just start here.
 
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