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quick question about root hormone

 
pollinator
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I need to get some trees transplanted this season before it gets too hot. My question is what is the Permies take on root hormone? I'm kind of being lazy about doing my own research. Last years cuttings/propagation did well until it stopped raining so obviously water was an issue. However I'd like to get a better understanding of root hormones in regards to organic growing. I am going to start with what I already have on the property which is black locust, smooth sumac/staghorn sumac (I can't tell which species they are) and one type of weeping willow, as well as a russian olive. I would like to try and give these transplants/cuttings a head start by adding root hormone since it is so late in the spring but wanted to see how the forum approaches these products since I know nothing about them, thanks!

Typically rainstorms can occur until the end of June but once July rolls around there is no rain until the fall and temps can reach 100 until late summer. Soil is near pure clay. I have plenty of mulch on hand and can provide some water.
 
pollinator
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What state are the cuttings? Do they have rootlets, or are these softwood? Its hard to comment other than generally water is good, and don't drown them in nitrogen until they have roots to take it up...
 
pollinator
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Make your own rooting hormone from your willow.




Layering.  I really like doing this but I've only done it with Hazelnuts.  I'm pretty sure this would work with Black Locust.



Root propagation



Plant From seeds.










 
Aaron Tusmith
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I realize I should have been more descriptive, my first question is regarding root hormones in general, are they ok to use in what one would hope to call an organic operation? and the transplants will be small offshoots of larger trees placed in a pre-dug hole and containing as much of the root body and original soil as possible. I would guess that these tree species are softwoods except for the black locust.
 
Scott Foster
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Aaron Tusmith wrote:I realize I should have been more descriptive, my first question is regarding root hormones in general, are they ok to use in what one would hope to call an organic operation? and the transplants will be small offshoots of larger trees placed in a pre-dug hole and containing as much of the root body and original soil as possible. I would guess that these tree species are softwoods except for the black locust.



Aaron for the most part store bought rooting hormones are synthetic variations of plant hormones.  (types of acid.)  So technically they are not organic unless they specifically say they are.  

rooting hormones

If you are looking to plant out a large # of cuttings, if this is a big operation, I suggest testing your techniques in a small nursery bed.  If not there are no guarantees.  I'm not familiar with any of these plants but the black locust.
Maybe someone else has suggestions in regards to the other varieties.
 
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Root hormones are very good to use, Willow water is a natural, free (usually) rooting hormone.
If the transplants have some roots a shot of B-12 mixed with water will prevent or slow the onset of transplant shock as well as promote root growth.

If a plant already has roots, rooting hormone isn't going to do as much good as B-12 solution will do, what the hormones do is kick non root cells to change to root cells.
Vitamin B-12 is a growth stimulant, the cells are encouraged to grow not change to another type of cell.

Redhawk
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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