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Which "soapberry" for temperate climates?

 
pollinator
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Location: Gulf Islands, Canada
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I'm interested in getting a perennial "soapberry" tree/bush to use as a replacement for other soaps but the scientific name seems to refer to a few different plants and I'm not 100% sure which would be the best to get in my climate. Shepherdia canadensis is commonly called soapberry around here, but it's edible, so I assume the saponin content isn't high enough to be useful? Sapindus drummondii (western soapberry) looks like it's hardy from zones 6-9 so that might be the one I'm looking for. Does anyone have experience with these plants and are there other options I'm overlooking?
 
pollinator
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Meg, I am growing wax myrtle, the southern ones have died here but they may work for you in that climate. The northern ones have smaller berries and don't look as nice but they are low maintenance.
 
pollinator
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buckeye nuts are loaded with saponins - it's what makes them poisonous. we've been experimenting a bit with drying and chipping them at our nut processing facility...might need more infrastructure than most folks have at some, though...
 
pollinator
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Western Soapberry is the one you're looking for.  Here it is a prolific, easy to grow small tree.  The trees produce copious fruit which is easy to collect.  I have it growing on my place.

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=SASAD

 
gardener
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Does anyone have a source of seeds/nuts for Western Soapberry, for planting?
This is something I've been really wanting to grow, but I have had trouble sourcing the actual seeds to get started.
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