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Greetings from Uruguay and question about hugelkultur

 
Posts: 29
Location: Coastal Uruguay. Wet winters, hot and dry summers. 1000 mm annual rain.
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Greetings from Uruguay. I have just found out about hugelkultur and am interested in getting started. This forum seems like a great place to start.

Here in Uruguay we have many exotic plant species. In this area in particular, we have an enormous amount of eucalyptus (blue gum I believe, although we call it "eucalyptus blanco" due to the interior color of the wood), acacia and mousehole. I believe these are all native to Australia and New Zealand.

I have lots of skinny, dead mousehole trees (called "transparente" here) around my property and would like to use them for my first hugelkutur bed. They rot pretty fast, much faster than the eucalyptus (plus I use the eucs for heating). Anyone have any experience with these or with acacias (lots of these too)? What about dry euclaptus leaves?

Mousehole tree:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoporum_laetum

¡Saludos!

 
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It just means that you will need to rebuild your beds more frequently and probably build them bigger to begin with. When building them I would make sure that the wood is as compact and dense as possible so that you can get as much wood in the base as possible.
 
Mother Tree
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I've heard that if you try to use acacia, it will just regrow where you bury the wood. It might depend on the species though.
 
Elliot Everett
Posts: 29
Location: Coastal Uruguay. Wet winters, hot and dry summers. 1000 mm annual rain.
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Thanks for the replies!
 
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