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Starting to grow mushrooms

 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 709
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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After a bit of reading it seems that oyster mushrooms are the best project for a beginner. I try with shop bought and cardbaoard. (wasn't there a thread that cardboard is not all that great?)
After hopefully my mycellium grows I want to 'plant' it somewere outside, what ist the best option? I can get mulch which could be either gum or pine or something else or logs which are cut freshly.

For the shitake: I searched in the net but there was not answer to my question: What happens after you harvest the mushrooms? Will it fruit again and again? Can I inocculate new stems with the material I have ( I don't really want to buy and buy once again).
 
Ross Gardener
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With shiitake mushrooms after the first flush the logs or bags are "dunked" which means they are submerged in clean water after the first flush to re-hydrate and to promote further flushes. Basically they are weighted down over night. Mycelium is very buoyant so they have to be held down with something.

Oysters are definitely less picky about temps and co2 levels so they are a very good first mushroom variety to grow.

If you can get enough cardboard spawn together you could make a bed outdoor and fill it with pasteurized straw or wood chips.

Pine is no good, neither are most conifers. Eucalyptus is probably no good do to is oil content, that might go for gums. Maybe certain acacia or wattles like black acacia would work OK. Generally hardwoods like aspen, oak, poplar cottonwood...broad leaf deciduous hardwoods are what you want for mushroom cultivation. I know the flora and fauna of Australia are pretty much the most unique in the world so its hard for me to offer any advice on stuff that might grow in your region due to my ignorance. I live in California and we do have Australian trees, 2 eucalyptus varieties that I know of and some acacia that have become invasive here. If you have acacia near you that is not resinous that might be your best bet.
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 709
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Thanks! What is enough cardboard spawn? One takeaway container or is it much more? I could as well fill one of these plastic boxes with lid (30 cm long). Do I cut up the whole mushroom or only the lower part of the stem?
 
Ken W Wilson
Posts: 340
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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If you're growing the spawn from mushrooms, I think you'll have to increase the spawn gradually. Maybe a pound or two of cardboard to a carton of mushrooms. I bought three pounds of spawn a couple months ago. Im letting the main part of the block grow and hopefully produce again. I'm trying to increase it now from pieces of the block and from some stems on cardboard. I'm not an expert though.

Plugging logs seems like the best way to go here. I'm going to try that this spring.
 
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