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Apple tree and possible lime tree help

 
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In my yard I have an Apple tree and I believe a lime tree. Can y’all help me identify the types of fruit and how I know they are ripe to pick? Attached a few pics of both.
Thanks!
Josh
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Hi Josh, welcome to Permies!  I test apples by picking one and seeing if the seeds are dark.  If so, they're probably ripe.  Those look like they could certainly be ripe based on the color and character.
 
Josh Squyres
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Cool. How about the limes?
 
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Josh Squyres wrote:Cool. How about the limes?



Limes can be picked when they're green or yellow coloured.

If you want lots of juice, pick them yellow. If you want them green, with more flavour, they should be heavy, have a distinctive lime aroma, and be a lighter green colour.
 
Josh Squyres
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How does the inside of this line and apple look? Lime doesn’t squeeze juice yet. Apple does not taste ripe and seed is white.
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Mike Haasl
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Yup, that apple doesn't look ripe yet to me.  
 
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Hi Josh. Those look more like oranges to me.
 
Josh Squyres
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Ok. So those are oranges, not limes??
 
Phil Stevens
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You'll know something more conclusive in a few months. Where I used to live (Tucson) our oranges started to ripen by Thanksgiving.
 
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Phil Stevens wrote:Hi Josh. Those look more like oranges to me.



That's what I was thinking.  If they are oranges, you've got about 6 months to wait.  The shape certainly looks more like an orange.

If they are limes, you just wait until they turn yellow and start to fall off the trees.  Limes in the store are picked way before they are ripe and thus, are green, but tree-ripened limes turn a yellowish-green.

 
Josh Squyres
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This is the tree
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Josh Squyres
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What month do you think the apples will ripen?
 
Mike Haasl
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If they were in my climate, I'd say 4 weeks, plus or minus 2.  My apples are the size of golf balls right now so I'm guessing you're a bit farther South.  That could mean my estimate isn't going to be accurate for you so take it with a grain of salt...
 
Marco Banks
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Josh Squyres wrote:This is the tree



Hard to tell, but it certainly looks like an orange of some sort.  Lemons tend to get tall a leggy.  Limes, not so much.  But a big robust tree like that -- my guess is some variety of orange.
 
Marco Banks
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Looking again, I'm almost certain that it's an orange.  And it's very healthy.  

The rule in our family is that nobody touches the navel orange tree until Christmas morning, when I squeeze a big pitcher of juice for breakfast.  After that, anyone can pick.  They'll be ripe by Christmas (or a little bit afterward).  

That that were my tree, I'd put down a layer of cardboard to kill the grass, and then cover the cardboard with 8 inches of wood chips.  Cover the grass as far as the drip line.  Some of the leaves on the tree are a bit yellow, which means that they're hungry for some extra N.  If you've got access to coffee grounds, throw those on the wood chips and water them in.  Really, any source of nitrogen is a plus.

So . . . if it were my tree, I'd go out there at night right before I went to bed and I'd pee around the perimeter of the tree.  Citrus trees are nitrogen pigs.  They'll take all the nitrogen you can give them, so peeing directly on the ground around the tree will not bother them in the least.  
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