Win a copy of Permaculture Playing Cards this week in the Permaculture forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

What is this tree?

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello!

Hoping someone could help me identify this tree on our new property. Want to make sure the berries aren't poisonous to our pups.

Thanks!

IMG_20190809_185302.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190809_185302.jpg]
IMG_20190809_185309.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190809_185309.jpg]
IMG_20190809_185324.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190809_185324.jpg]
 
master steward
Posts: 2902
Location: West Tennessee
921
cat purity trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Sam, welcome to Permies. Possibly a cherry tree? It's a little hard for me to tell, but that's my guess.
 
Posts: 97
Location: Fryslân, Netherlands
37
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Would that not be a medlar - Mespilus germanica? I'm not 100% on it, as I don't grow one myself. The fruit is probably still growing.
 
pioneer
Posts: 123
Location: Tennessippi
33
purity forest garden gear foraging trees books cooking food preservation medical herbs woodworking ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It might be a medlar, It might be some sort of apple or pear. I really don't think it could be a quince. I is not a cherry/plum/apricot/sloe/peach/nectarine, but it is in the rose family. Cut one open cross-wise to find out for sure wether or not this is a pomme fruit. You can send a picture of that if you need further help.
 
Sam Eddy
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you all for your responses! I should have mentioned that this is in southeast Wisconsin. I apologize for the quality of the pictures. I would go take better ones, but the house we're moving to with this tree is an hour and a half away, so I can't exactly just buzz out there.

I've attached two additional pictures. The first one is a zoomed in shot of one of previous pictures I sent. The second one is a picture I found online of a serviceberry. Is it possibly a serviceberry?
Screenshot_20190810-170250-2.png
[Thumbnail for Screenshot_20190810-170250-2.png]
Zoomed Image
serviceberryripecloseup1.JPG
[Thumbnail for serviceberryripecloseup1.JPG]
Online Serviceberry
 
gardener
Posts: 1522
Location: Los Angeles, CA
373
hugelkultur forest garden books urban chicken food preservation
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Crab apple?  The leaves certainly look like apple leaves.  

There are all sorts of different kinds of crab apples.  
 
Posts: 49
Location: Zone 3 Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like a crabapple tree to me. But the size of the fruit may help. Serviceberries aka Saskatoon berries aka June berry and on are tasty, sweet, and are about the size of a blueberry. Crabapples are larger and crisper. Mini mini apples that are often quite tart for a long time. Some sweeten, some don't. If of the tastier type of crabapple they are awesome to add to jelly and jam making experiments because they are high in pectin. The trees are super beautiful in the spring, with lovely blossoms.
 
Michael Holtman
pioneer
Posts: 123
Location: Tennessippi
33
purity forest garden gear foraging trees books cooking food preservation medical herbs woodworking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looking at the pictures, I do think it is an apple. It may have come from a seed. These should help you make sure it is not(or maybe it is) a service berry (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berry_%28botany%29,https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pome). Do try to get your hands on the book entitled "botany in a day". It is wonderfully thorough on covering plant families.
 
Viola Bluez
Posts: 49
Location: Zone 3 Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The thing with Saskatoons is they usually have a very shrubby appearance: Saskatoons at a U-Pick.

However, yours may be trained to one trunk, like a crabapple tree, which is of itself very cool.
 
Posts: 331
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
50
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Whatever it is, I would stake my reputation on it being edible... it's in the rose family.
 
Viola Bluez
Posts: 49
Location: Zone 3 Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Hester Winterbourne wrote:Whatever it is, I would stake my reputation on it being edible... it's in the rose family.

Hey that's very cool. I don't think I knew that before.

Here's a few pics of my crabapple, that look a lot like the pics here:

 
Posts: 70
Location: Southside of Virginia
15
goat chicken bee medical herbs wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Flowering Crabapple -- an ornamental tree that can be used as a pollinator tree for an apple orchard.
 
Michael Holtman
pioneer
Posts: 123
Location: Tennessippi
33
purity forest garden gear foraging trees books cooking food preservation medical herbs woodworking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Barbara Martin wrote:[C]an be used as a pollinator tree for an apple orchard.


Or eaten, or grafted onto!
 
You can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!