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tree identification

 
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can someone please help me identify these trees?

i have no idea what they are.

thanks much.
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Try looking up hawthorn. There are lots of varieties.  In Ohio we have a wild "invasive" hawthorn, some times just called thorn tree. Those little branches off the main stem come to a point that is sharp and gets me every year when I hack it back for kindling. The stems are very strong compared to other common woods. Berries in fall that birds eat at full ripeness and only grows about 10ft at maturity.
 
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It can be harder to tell this time of year without leaves, but my guess from the first picture, would be plums on the left and right, maybe apple or pear in the middle.

Looks like you might have some fruit trees!

If you can get a close up of the branches and buds that can help a lot.
 
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The top three look just like apricots, how they grow in Ladakh (I've never seen apricots growing in the US, and other fruits might look similar).

Where in the world are you? That would help others in making reasonable guesses.
 
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Firstly, W Rav, welcome to the Permies Forums!

Based on the bark, I'd say the first three are photos of a young cherry tree.
 
Will Ven
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Amit Enventres wrote:Try looking up hawthorn. There are lots of varieties.  In Ohio we have a wild "invasive" hawthorn, some times just called thorn tree. Those little branches off the main stem come to a point that is sharp and gets me every year when I hack it back for kindling. The stems are very strong compared to other common woods. Berries in fall that birds eat at full ripeness and only grows about 10ft at maturity.



ok. will do. thanks!
 
Will Ven
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Rebecca Norman wrote:The top three look just like apricots, how they grow in Ladakh (I've never seen apricots growing in the US, and other fruits might look similar).

Where in the world are you? That would help others in making reasonable guesses.



in north eastern switzerland.
 
Will Ven
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thanks to all who responded! i am learning a lot.

I am sorry the photos are not so great. Will probably need to wait until summer to see the leaves and whatever grows on the tree. i will report back when I know more.

have a nice day
 
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I would say plum or apricot. They are pretty similar. Plum would be my best guess.
 
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Nearly positive the top ones are apricots. Plums tend to have spikes along the branch internodes, peach have a more red tint to the twig tips.The last is another fruit tree growing up from the grafted root stock. Probably going to produce undesirable fruit.
 
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