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girdling, scarring standing trees

 
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I came across this a while back. I knew of girdling trees of course, but this was different. I did find a discussion on here on permies about pealing all the bark off standing trees, but this is still a different practice.
Here's the link (https://www.facebook.com/pg/northmenguild/photos/?tab=album&album_id=2562922047057446&__xts__%5B0%5D=68.ARB3SADKF3qPFV_bmTnSs1jYEhUYXBKWHHr-Gfna7gmTcxwuXcvhnpQzK9t-0e89f1jQ9OsxpPZPUaTuPt0bbbi3aZc7p9DYQ1CcwMgMOI_ddQGvo5NHTYv7LKEwMl7SrO-a-fBQbUKEpIrrbuvjamYohpMYR-4r0fPsxiBDraKXa0bJgIhZYYizGBvnygkE8bpfdIC11MOYdhhku0lUyDfjr-KGZzgHlB6bPadn4ma2fP1tNwSAo9qvq3DAEvVi_iWF5NvOT_PFG8cyjkIBCPr7KpmIfPL4CMppZv92Rj0VSKVzjoZKic6GKgYHVwloQ8tdGOjGBA&__tn__=-UCH-R)

I have three pines that I am experimenting with. One is girdled, one is scared, and one has had both treatments. When it comes time to cut them down, I will use sections of each being fully buried, partially buried(like a fence post), laying on the ground, and exposed on a "foundation".

Does anyone here have experience with this?
What should we expect for the outcome of the experiment?
 
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Wow, they make some seriously nice stuff!  Not sure I understand why the girdling?
 
Michael Holtman
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As I understand it, Artie, girdling is what kills the tree and scaring is what makes the wood far more rot resistant.
 
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Very interesting, in today's impatient world I can understand how these techniques have diminished...but most of us here value being a long-term steward of our land and to me this is useful knowledge.

The part about how once the tree realizes it is mortally wounded, and releases it's energies through root connections to the surrounding forest is intriguing.

I have always felt bad about taking down a live tree This doesn't really help that feeling (especially when they mention a "slow death") but at least it seems to be a way where the usable wood is a better product, and the vital lifeblood of the tree is not wasted.

I'll definitely be doing some more research on this, thanks for the post!

 
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So you basically bleed the organism out into the land that fed it, so that its kind can consume its lifeblood, so that lifeblood doesn't rest in the harvested wood, to feed fungi?

I mean, we chop up the bodies of trees to spread at the feet of living trees, I suppose it's no more morbid than that.

-CK
 
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I have no facebook account, and cannot read the link. I have elm trees that were cut, that are sending up new baby trees from the roots that are left in the ground.  Would trees that were girdled to kill them still do root sprouts?
 
Michael Holtman
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Ty Greene wrote:
I'll definitely be doing some more research on this



Wonderful!!! Keep us updated!
 
Michael Holtman
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I have no facebook account, and cannot read the link. I have elm trees that were cut, that are sending up new baby trees from the roots that are left in the ground.  Would trees that were girdled to kill them still do root sprouts?



I wish I knew how to share it with you. I don't even know what qualifies as digital theft, but maybe someone can help us share this, and do so legally?

From my observation, yes they should. This is specifically for conifers I believe. Maybe woody monocots in general, but I doubt that.
 
Michael Holtman
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Chris Kott wrote: I mean, we chop up the bodies of trees to spread at the feet of living trees, I suppose it's no more morbid than that.
-CK


Yes, that is how I came to think of it. That and the end product is supposed to last so much longer, so we have even more materials/products made per acre as time goes by.
 
Artie Scott
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So I get that girdling the tree kills it, but had no idea it helped keep the wood from rotting!  Very interesting. . The other method you mention - scaring - I assume doesn’t kill the tree, but has a similar effect on the wood for when you do cut it?
 
Artie Scott
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Sorry, please disregard - when I first looked my phone jumped straight to the pictures and I didn’t see the description - now that I see the write-up, it answers my questions
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I have no facebook account, and cannot read the link. I have elm trees that were cut, that are sending up new baby trees from the roots that are left in the ground.  Would trees that were girdled to kill them still do root sprouts?


Hey Pearl- I dont know what browser you're using and if this will work, but I've gotten rid of my social media. In Chrome on Windows, I right clicked on the link and selected "Open in new incognito window" (to make sure the darn thing doesn't somehow resuscitate my FB account, which i don't want). I was able to see the photos and text, hopefully whatever you're using will allow you to do something similar.
 
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