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growing in Zone 7B

 
pollinator
Posts: 373
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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I live very close to the Tennessee state line (in North Alabama) and want to grow something new and does not require a lot of care. I like to keep the trees under 12 foot for easy harvest.

I am currently growing Asian Pear, Asian Persimmon, Pomegranate, Pawpaw, Che, Kiwi, Jujube, Figs and several varieties of Plums and Pluots.

I also grow berries but I like to grow some bigger fruit that you can pick and eat.  I have ordered a mulberry to go with a mulberry I found growing on my fence line.

Does anyone have experience in growing hardy citrus in Zone 7B?  I see a McKenzie Farms has Hardy Citrus that can tolerate the low teens (F).  I am not sure how they taste or if they require a lot of maintenance to keep disease down.

Is there anything new and interesting that can grow in my area?    I have around 35 foot by 20 foot area to grow in that is on the southside of the house and heavy woods on the other side so it will be protected from very cold winds but also have no steady breeze.
 
pollinator
Posts: 220
Location: Ozarks
55
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Peaches of course. Or nectarines if you don't like the fuzz.

Asian plums are good but not as big of a fruit as domestic

 
pollinator
Posts: 519
Location: Denmark 57N
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Apples, pears, quince, elder and medlars.

Funny how zone means so little, I can't grow half of your list even though I am technically the same zone.
 
gardener
Posts: 6168
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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We are looking into Meyer lemons and even a grapefruit, I've been told that the Meyer lemon should do fine for us but the grapefruit might need a winter house to keep it from loosing ripening fruits.

We currently grow; figs, apples, pears, plums, mulberry, persimmon (American) for our fruit trees, we also have blueberry (high bush and low bush).

We have also been trying to decide if we want to put in a conservatory building to be able to grow some of the tropical items I love, like guava, mango and vanilla bean vines.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 53
Location: Nara, Japan
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Not sure about availability in your area, but Yuzu is a cold hardy citrus.

There was one tree in the yard of a house we lived in briefly in Tottori prefecture (zone 7) and many in an unmaintained park next door. The house we stayed in had been unoccupied for at least three years, and I assume the trees were neglected during that time. We didn't do anything special for them either and all the trees produced plenty anyway.  

Yuzu is mostly used for it's scent, which is very nice. The skin is used in cooking and gives a sweet, tangy flavor. It's also thrown whole into the bathtub to make a yuzuburo (yuzu bath) which smells really nice and is relaxing and refreshing as this capybara can attest.

From izushaboten zoo, 伊豆シャボテン動物公園 カピバラはゆず湯.


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Capybaras at izushaboten zoo enjoy yuzu baths every winter.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 373
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Has anyone tried growing Mayhaw, Medlar, Baby Shipova, or fresh eating Quince in a zone 7B?  Very long hot humid summers and short but cold (10F) winters?  I am sort of leaning toward the fresh eating Quince from Ukraine
..
 
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