Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Tomato spots/stripes

 
Posts: 6
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have searched the internet and can't find an answer. What are these brown stripes/spots on my tomatoes?
20190914_105113.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190914_105113.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 197
Location: Gulf Islands, Canada
54
hugelkultur cat books medical herbs homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To me it looks like something has scraped little scratches into the tomatoes, especially the yellow ones. It looks a lot like leaf miner damage I've seen on other plants and also like a very small version of the scarring my aloe gets when my cats manage to get at it for playtime. So my guess would be some kind of insect damage, unless there was something else near the tomato plants that could have scratched them (exposed wire on the cages?).
 
Kasia Mannino
Posts: 6
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The are just staked. Nothing rubbing against them or near the hanging fruit. Also, my other varieties that I'm going in the same area don't have this.
 
pollinator
Posts: 376
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
120
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know what causes it, but they sure look delish to me! Those yellow tastebombs are too small to squeeze out of their skin i guess. Maybe let them ripen a bit longer if it bothers you. Or stir fry them.
I've got this with 20 tomato green zebra plants but much worse, with hard vertical  gushes. And they had bud rot, which i addressed by adding chalk to the water. I cut them off and threw them on the compost if it was bad. If it just started while they are ripe i read you can still use half the tomato. But the chalk made it better.
Then some got mosaics disease, i freaked out because i read it's very contagious and gave up watering them for a bit , but somehow it got contained to a few plants. And the whole greenhouse is pumping out a kilo of delicious tomatoes a day with no end in sight, i share with friends and community now, all the perfect ones go to others.
Next year i'll prepare the soil better, and only plant the seeds of the good plants with little problems. See how that goes.
I also give bad tomatos to the chickens, they'll pick the seeds out.
 
Hugo Morvan
pollinator
Posts: 376
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
120
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just been to greenhouse, taken the good ones for the bbq this afternoon.
I thought maybe with tomatoes it's like with people, most aren't perfect, and if you look close enough the ones you thought were perfect aren't either. But if you have enough of them you can collect a beautiful bunch. Or when you chemically enhance them with steroids and plastic surgery, like in the industrial complex.
Maybe it's our perception of imperfect things as well.
Anyway, that's my sunday philosophy bit.
tomatoz.jpg
[Thumbnail for tomatoz.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 191
Location: OK High Plains Prairie, 23" rain avg
31
homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We are having a stink bug epidemic this year. My local market garden got hit hard. Her tomatoes had spots similar to these, lots more than yours and ruined the tomatoes. They sprayed with Dawn dish soap in water in the evening then washed it off in the a.m. before the sun hit the field. And they walked through after that and picked off bugs. The farmer said that treatment killed a lot of the stink bugs. We have green, brown, and black stink bugs here. I showed the extension agent this picture of apricots and she said it looked like stink bug damage.
apricot-stink-bugs.jpg
[Thumbnail for apricot-stink-bugs.jpg]
damage to apricots by stink bugs
 
Nothing? Or something? Like this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!