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History of the Striped Maycock squash.

 
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Greetings! Blake here wanna find out the overall history of the Striped Maycock squash and its historic connection to all Native tribes in the eastern U.S. I've heard about this since last year from Stephen Smith from Roughwood Seed about it's historic use and range in the pre Columbian period to the post settlement time. I wanna find out your take on the time periods the squash has been used before or after European settlement on this land. Out!
 
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I don't know much about the history of the Maycock squash other than it being historically grown in the same region as the Nanticoke C. maxima squash. The morphology of this maycock squash suggests that it might be related to the Mandan squash that was historically grown in the North Dakota region of the United States. One historical method of preserving C. pepo squash among the Hidatsa people of North Dakota involved dehydrating the squash over an open fire. I have not been able to find much information on how to replicate this historical process of preserving squash for food, but you might be able to replicate a similar process by drying the maycock squash in a food dehydrator after slicing the squash into small rings or chunks.

Your original post suggests that you've already contacted Stephen Smith to learn about the history of Maycock squash. If this is not the case, I'm in contact with him on Facebook, so I could ask him if he has any more information about this squash.
 
Ryan M Miller
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Although you may have already contacted Stephen Smith about Maycock squash, I just asked him again about the squash through Facebook messenger. Here is what he had to say about historical preservation methods and food uses for Maycock squash:
"It was dried and stored like beef jerky, let become “gourds” to be used as bowls, spoons, etc., eaten green when young and tender, and baked with when larger."
Just as I suspected, one method of preserving the squash involved smoking the squash over an open fire. I'll see if anyone else is familiar with Maycock squash.
 
Blake Lenoir
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Hey Ryan, Blake here to find out if you or anybody you know is growing the Maycock pumpkin, cause I'm trying to stay away from modern pepo varieties such as yellow crookneck, scallop, Connecticut and the like to help restore my Native American gardens back to their Pre-Columbian state as much as I can, while I add post Columbian types such as sweet potato and Hubbard squashes to add more historic flavor and culture to liven up the story of my community and region at my community farm. If you're or anybody's growing them, then I'd like to have some to be shared in order to plant more to return the historic flavor and culture to my gardens. Much love!
 
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Hi, I'm looking for seeds of the Nanticoke maycock squash.  Do you have any seeds available?
ta.kirby@hotmail.com
 
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In case you haven't found another source, this is where I found the Nanticoke squash.

https://store.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/collections/squash/products/nanticoke-squash
 
Blake Lenoir
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Greetings! My Striped Maycocks have done extremely well at my community farm. I wanna find out if anybody has grown them by far? And could I have more seed of the Striped this fall?
 
Blake Lenoir
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Back again! Anybody know any recipes for stripe Maycock? Any more historic details besides the ones already presented on how Native Americans ate it after the settlers came here and stuff? And did the settlers also had maycock as well?
 
Blake Lenoir
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Back again! I've tried to reach Stephen from Roughwood about the Maycocks and how I can eat them. I'm waiting back on the recipes cause  just harvested them today from my farm.
 
Blake Lenoir
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Anybody heard of its close cousin the finger squash which also used to be grown by the Lenape and other tribes throughout the eastern U.S? It was grown by the Lenape at Raccoon Creek, New Jersey a long time ago. Please give me some historic details of the finger squash.
 
Blake Lenoir
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Back with some huge news! Harvested some medium size stripe Maycock today at my community farm in Chicago today. Wish I had some pictures of these pumpkins and they was bigger than my hand. Got a couple about the size of a small basketball. I'll find some pictures of my large stripe Maycock soon!
 
Blake Lenoir
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Hello! Anybody in? You all act like you missed my reports of my harvested Maycock and my possible interest in the finger squash which used to be grown by other Native American tribes other than the Lenape.
 
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Thanks for showing the maycocks at the seed library meeting, Blake.  I'd like to try growing those next year, if you keep any seed.  I have not heard of finger squash.   Do you know if the name means it is long, like a delicate, or does it have little finger projections?
 
Blake Lenoir
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Yeah, I do have some seed of those right now. I'm gonna send those to you either on the 2nd Tuesday of next month or on the 16th. On the finger squash, it was recently called the Yugoslavian squash or pineapple squash, but those are labeled false since it's originally a Native American squash that belonged to the Lenape and other tribes who used to have it centuries ago according to Stephen Smith from Roughwood Seed in Philadelphia. Any of you grown finger squash this year?
 
Blake Lenoir
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By the way, the finger squash look like a white octopus without eyes or mouth and just short fingers. Go look it up and you'll see what I'm talking about.
 
Blake Lenoir
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Anybody grown the Mandan squash this year? I just wanna compare my Maycock to the Mandan to see if they're alike and other characteristics that bridge the gene pool to find how much they have in common with one another. What's the history of that historic summer squash from the Dakotas?
 
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